The Theme Of Blood In Shakespeare's Macbeth

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Everyone makes rash decisions in the heat of the moment, which leads to regrettable, and wrongful outcomes. Whether the remaining consequences prove as physical or psychological, all affect the guilty party in some way or another. Everything has a reaction, which proves capable of destroying an individual from the inside out, forcing misery on bystanders. In the seventeenth century tragedy Macbeth, William Shakespeare uses the motif of blood to reveal the everlasting guilt people live with as a result of their horrific actions; therefore, people must grasp an awareness of their thoughts and consequent happenings to prevent the consumption of an individual’s soul by indiscretion. The guilt left behind by people’s awful actions lurks beneath …show more content…
Macbeth enters into shock after he completes the assassination of King Duncan. Shakespeare uses the blood remaining on Macbeth’s hands to represent how the guilt accompanied with atrocious actions can not merely dissipate. Macbeth fails to shake the idea of Duncan’s death by his hands from his mind, which results in the need for Lady Macbeth to pick up the pieces. Much like the blood remaining on Macbeth’s hands, remorse fails to leave after the accomplishment of murderous tasks at hand. Rather, guilt builds within someone until the individual becomes driven to the point of insanity. Likewise, Macbeth loses his mind and ends up as the guilty party to several more murders. No matter the size of an attempt to mask the appearance of shame, regret remains timeless. As Lady Macbeth attempts to wash away her blood-stained hands, she complains, “Here’s the smell of the blood still. All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand” (V.i.53-55). The feelings of remorse and regret begin to consume Lady Macbeth’s attempts at chastity. Shakespeare shows the consequences of Lady Macbeth’s deteriorating innocence and reveals how guilt, represented by the blood, overtakes a person’s soul. After Lady Macbeth convinces her husband to kill any obstacles to the …show more content…
Often those blind to the real culprits have a sense of delusion. For example, after the realization of the murder of King Duncan, Lennox exclaims, “Their hands and faces were all badged with blood. So were their daggers, which unwiped we found upon their pillows” (II.iii.120-123). The blood found on the guards comes from the attempt to cover up the murderer, Macbeth. Shakespeare uses dramatic irony since the audience knows the reason for the guards’ death to show how some actions deepen the appearance of placed blame in attempt to hide the real culprit. The blood-smeared guards represent how some individuals attempt to wipe blame from themselves onto another being; however, remorse stands with the criminal no matter the attempt to erase such emotions. The characters within the play unassociated with the murder stand dumfounded and oblivious to the situation. The use of dramatic irony builds a feeling of urgency as the hunt begins for the culprits. The masking of the guards with blood symbolizes Macbeth’s attempt to place blame from his actions onto those around him. However, no matter the attempt to give blame to another individual, guilt will seep into the mind of the culprit until the deterioration of the offender occurs. Macbeth acknowledges the fact that he commits an act of vileness, which leads to his dismay. In attempt to ease his conscious, Macbeth exclaims to

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