The Tell Tale Heart And The Cask Of Amontillado

“Living well is the best revenge” although this quote has been passed down for generations, not everyone may follow it. In Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell Tale Heart” and “The Cask of Amontillado” the narrators seem to stray from this advice. Between the two stories the narrators have different motives with the same ending goal, success. For example, one narrator relies on revenge while the other madness. These two motives alone create the terror, suspense, and a creepy atmosphere the Poe is known for. Even though a murderer can be as quiet and sneaky as a mouse they should never put all their trust into just being deceitful. Albeit, these two stories have a fair share of differences they have similarities as well. One in particular would include …show more content…
In “ The Tell Tale Heart” the narrator, whose name is unidentified, wants nothing more than the removal of an old man’s eye. “For his gold I had no desire. I think it was his eye! (Tell...P1)” The quote above supports the narrator’s madness and motive previously mentioned. Many would think only a crazy person without the want or need for power, wealth, or revenge. Poe’s “The cask of Amontillado” proves just that when the narrator, Montresor, vows revenge. “ The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as best I could, but when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge. (Cask...P1)” As stated Montresor was bullied and teased by Fortunato, a jokester, until he went too far. Although, these two motives are far from similar they both could use the same advice, “ A wrong is unredressed when retribution is taken upon the redresser. (Cask...P1)” This quote represents and symbolizes the nonessential use of murder for an unjustified murder. It proves that a problem is not fixed when extreme measures are taken upon the wrongdoer. In either case, the premeditated and obscene murders that take place are indescribable and create the possibility of getting …show more content…
(Tell...P1)” This quote bluntly shows the lack of mercy and the proposal to kill the old man. Although, the narrator had an obviously well thought out plan he does get caught to the reader’s surprise. In another Poe story, “The Cask of Amontillado,” the murderer, Montresor, plainly says “...when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge.” He does not hesitate when he takes Fortunato, the victim, to the catacombs, and this may add the suspicion that Montresor may not have a plan. This thought is quickly forgotten when Montresor builds a wall around his chained up victim. He even goes on to defy everyone and keeps from getting caught, “...no mortal disturbed them. (Cask...P4)” Montresor’s success disproves the theory that a premeditated murder is the most successful. In conclusion, both “The Cask of Amontillado” and “The Tell Tale Heart” are proof that premeditated murders are not necessarily successful, but instead

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