Anti-Semitism In The Synoptic Gospels

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The Synoptic Gospels are written by Matthew, Mark, Luke and John to share with others the life, ministry and death of Jesus Christ. In the Gospels, there are different portrayals of the Jews that have hindered the way people read the Gospels today. A majority of the Gospel is interpreted with an anti-Semitic point of view. Anti-Semitism can be defined as the prejudice against, hatred of, or discrimination against Jews as an ethnic, religious, or racial group. Matthew, Mark, Luke and John all write their Gospels with more bias than others. For many years, the debate that the Synoptic Gospels portray an anti-Semitic point of view have been contested by many authors including Dennis Hamm and Norman A. Beck that each provide an argument to …show more content…
Beck wrote this passage with an anti-Semitic stance towards the Gospels. In support his anti-Semitic view of the Gospels, Beck poses the major question, “What are we who live as Christians during the last decade of the twentieth century going to do about the anti-Jewish polemic in the New Testament, which has provided the theological basis for oppressive, unjust, and extremely hurtful anti-Semitism?” At the beginning of Beck’s passage, he mentions the question of authority and elaborates on the question of “Do our scriptural traditions have authority over us, or do we have authority over our scriptures?” Beck mentions that in 2 Tim. 3:14-16, Timothy was instructed to demonstrate everything that he learned and who he learned it from about the sacred writings prepared him intellectually for salvation through his faith. The passage demonstrates the authority of scriptural traditions over us as seen in 2 Pet. 1:19-21. In more recent times, we have submitted ourselves to the canonical books of the Old and New Testaments that are divinely inspired and the inherent Word of God while recognizing the books as the only infallible authority in life. It is very common of a religion, when under controversy, to increase the written symbols to the point of absolute validity and absolute authority in order for people of their own religious tradition to feel that they have significant authority over others. The increasing validity of one’s religion elaborates on the question of authority. It provides the bases of the way people view the Gospels and how they interpret them to be anti-Semitic. Beck also states under the question of authority that one must have a relationship of mutual authority and responsibility in order to be desirable for our own sculptural traditions. Over the years, people have stood in front of their sculptural traditions to judge the content of the scriptures. There were

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