The Symbol Of Blood In Macbeth

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Register to read the introduction… Blood as a symbol is developed throughout the play until it becomes the dominating …show more content…
Lady Macbeth starts this off when she asks the spirits to "make thick my blood,? What she is saying by this, is that she wants to make herself insensitive and remorseless for the deeds which she is about to commit. Lady Macbeth knows that the evidence of blood is a treacherous symbol, and knows it will deflect the guilt from her and Macbeth to the servants when she says "smear the sleepy grooms with blood.? and "If he do bleed, I'll gild the faces of the grooms withal, for it must seem their guilt." When Banquo states "and question this most bloody piece of work," and Ross says "is't known who did this more than bloody deed?? they are both inquiring as to who performed the treacherous acts upon Duncan. When Macbeth is speaking about Malcolm and Donalbain, he refers to them as "bloody cousins". Throughout the whole of this section of the play, blood has the imagery of being wicked, evil and deadly, and is used to portray that …show more content…
She says "Out damned spot! Out I say! One: two: why then 'tis time to don?t: hell is murky. Fie, my lord, fie, a soldier, and afeard? What need we fear who knows it when none can call out power to account? Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him?? This speech represents the fact that she cannot wipe the bloodstains of Duncan off her hands; the guilt is playing on her conscience, it is driving her insane knowing that she will always live with the knowledge that she committed an absolutely atrocious crime, under equally atrocious circumstances. It is ironic, that she says this, because right after the murder, when Macbeth was feeling guilty, she said, "A little water clears us of this deed." This represents the fact that she undergoes a large character change, for at this point guilt has failed to enter her thoughts, for she is relieved that the deed was successful, and she knows that she will now be queen to Macbeth, which was the point of the murder. When the doctor of the castle finds out about this sleepwalking, he tells Macbeth "As she is troubled with thick-coming fantasies,? What this means, is that Lady Macbeth is having fantasies or dreams which are damaging her soul, although the doctor does not know why. He can see that the dreams are related to blood, but he cannot see that they are related in any way to guilt.

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