The Sustainable Development Goals: The Achievements Of The Sustainable Development Goals

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1. Background to research problem
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the intergovernmental set of 17 aspirational goals with 169 targets to be attained by 2030 (United Nations. Sustainable Development Goals. (2015). This agenda builds on the achievements of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which were adopted in 2000 and guided development action for the last 15 years to 2015 (United Nations. Millennium Development Goals 2000). These goals are part of the ambitious and bold sustainable development agenda focusing on the three interconnected elements of sustainable development which are economic growth, social inclusion and environmental protection.

SDG No 1 focuses on ending poverty in all its forms everywhere by 2030 (Sustainable Development Solutions Network 2015:24). Specifically, the goal is aimed at eradicating extreme poverty for all people everywhere, currently measured as
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Statistics shows that the Sub Saharan Africa (SSA) is hardly hit by many forms of poverty. For example, Human Development Index (HDI) reveals that most countries in the SSA have stagnated or even declined since 1990. Thus this leaves this region as the most poor in the entire world. This agrees with the fact that 28 out of 31 countries with low human development are in SSA(UNDP, 2006: 265).
2. Problem statement
Globally, poverty reduction strategy is working. For example, the world managed to reduce the global population living in low human development by nearly 2 billion beating MDG target (Human Development Report 2015:4)
As observed by Addae-Korankye (2014:150), despite the above global commitment and achievement made in the past 15 years, progress in Africa remains disappointing. It is reported that since 1990, income poverty has fallen in almost all the regions except in Africa especially the SSA where, incidence and absolute number of people living in income poverty has

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