The Suffrage Movement During The 1920's

Good Essays
The roaring 20s was a time of great change for women, on the work front, in politics, in fashion, education, and in values. During the 20s women transformed into independent, strong and new women. However, women still had a long way to go to achieve equality in the workforce and society. Prior to the 20s women were denied a lot of the rights that men had. Women were not able to own property. Women didn’t have the right to vote, and women also did not have a legal claim to monies they earned from working. Women also lived under a tremendous amount of pressure to act and dress a certain way. These discriminations sparked the rise of the Suffrage Movement which became a national movement in 1848. The Suffrage Movements belief was that women …show more content…
It was during the 20s when major changes started to happen for women. The most significant change accomplished by the Suffrage Movement was when women were finally allowed to vote when on August 18th, 1920 the 19th Amendment was ratified. http://www.american-historama.org/1913-1928-ww1-prohibition-era/women-in-the-1920s.htm The passing of the Sheppard-Towner Act in the 20s was also as a result of the Suffrage Movement. The Act made it possible for women and children's health clinics to get federal funding. https://www.americanhistoryusa.com/working-voting-women-1920s/ Probably the most visible change for women in the 20s was the fashion and attitude change that occurred amongst women. No era is more recognized for the change in women's appearance than the 20s. Women during the 20s abandoned a lot of traditions, they cut their hair very short, wore shorter skirts, they wore makeup, they were more free-spirited, and many started smoking and drinking freely. Divorce also became easier for women, so many women were finding independence and enjoying it. …show more content…
During the 20s most women remained in traditional roles of housewives and mothers. Not all women wanted or welcomed change and women in the workforce still experienced a lot of discrimination in roles and wages. During the war, many women filled the roles of the men in their jobs however once the war was over men returned to their jobs and women were forced to roles that were coined as female roles such as teachers, nurses, secretaries and librarians. https://www.americanhistoryusa.com/working-voting-women-1920s/
Also, society regarded the cultural changes women were making was creating a negative response from society, resulting in women being strongly judged.
In conclusion, women achieved a lot of change during the roaring 20s. They earned the right to vote, they changed the norms for style and culture, and they achieved federal funding for health clinics for women and children. However, they had a long way to go to obtain all the rights they deserved, as the struggle for equality in the workforce and society was far from over, and still, today is a challenge for

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Women's Right To Vote

    • 1122 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The right to vote, down to its core, has had an illustrious history here in the United States of America. More specifically, women gained the right to vote less than one century ago. Upon the ratification of the 19th Amendment in August of 1920, women were now able to have a say their governance. It was how women gained the right to vote that has made a lasting impact. Not only did they overcome stereotypes, but they also exited their proper “sphere” in society.…

    • 1122 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women Of The 1920's

    • 1003 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The working woman of the 30’s were the backbone of their families and parts of the country. Many women had to take up jobs to support their families. However, this caused a problem for many women due to their lack of job training. During this time many industrial factories had to fire their workers (The Depression and World War Ⅱ 1930-1945). With there being a lack of jobs for men, women were seen as “un-American,money grubbers” (Mickey Moran).…

    • 1003 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This rise of protests and demands was also known as the women’s suffrage movement. Many factors contributed to the rise of the women’s suffrage movement. Once women started joining the workforce, they suddenly saw their rights to provide economically for a family taken away and shamed. In society 's eyes, women were meant to stay home, cook, clean, and take care of the children. This domestic role was not favored by women.…

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Alice Paul Essay

    • 780 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Paul was a middle class woman. She had escaped the social norms of women by becoming a suffragist by fighting for her beliefs. By leading the marches and rallies, there was an increase in her social standing because of the supporters she got while doing so. When the 19th Amendment was ratified, her social standing rose once again because she was able to accomplish her goal and change the lives of all women in the United States. As time progressed, women looked at her as a powerful woman in that she had changed the perspective of others of the impact that one person can have on society.…

    • 780 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    During the 1920s, the image of the American woman evolved from one of submission, to one of independence. The laws were changing in the United States; women’s groups, such as the National Women’s Party, were working to gain equal rights for women and they began achieving these rights piece by piece in this era. In 1920, the 19th Amendment was ratified thereby allowing women the right to vote. During this decade, there were astronomical changes to laws, education, and the job market for women that would essentially create a “new” American woman. The beginning of the 1920’s sparked a huge change in the law in favor of women.…

    • 783 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women's Jobs In The 1920s

    • 1593 Words
    • 7 Pages

    In America, women have the same rights of any other man, but it hasn 't always been like that. Before the woman 's rights movement, many women didn 't have a voice in America 's past male dominated society. In fact, the mere thought of a woman participating in anything besides, cleaning their husbands houses, raising their children, or making dinner was absurd. Throughout America, women were viewed as fragile and dimwitted, and nothing a woman said was taken seriously. However, when too many men left to fight in World War Two, more women were pressured into working “male” jobs.…

    • 1593 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Known for its fast paced lifestyle, experimentation, and break in traditions, the ‘Roaring Twenties’ produced ideals and technology that changed America forever. One of the many prominent features of the early 20th century was the emergence of the “flapper,” women who deviated from the traditional Victorian female standards at the time. These women often bobbed their hair, wore short dresses and skirts, and took on many characteristics that had only been deemed appropriate for men. The passing of the 19th Amendment in 1920 granted women the right to vote, allowing them a direct interaction with politics for the first time. To highlight their independence, women also began taking jobs in the workforce as well as attending college.…

    • 1503 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    At the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, women had no rights to file for divorce, own property, vote or get the same education as men. However, the nineteenth century brought changes to women issues, more women were starting to recognized the imbalanced of power between the sexes and saw winning the right to vote would bring them closer to equality. During the starting stages of the women’s suffrage movement, elite and middle class women were the driving force in the movement. However, as the movement continued more working class women started to support the campaign. The women’s suffrage movement first started attracting major attention from Parliament when the philosopher John Stuart Mill proposed a new amendment calling for the inclusion of women’s right to vote in 1866.…

    • 723 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The nearly oppressive requirements impressed upon women in wartime America opened the door for vast changes to gender relations in the country. The largest beneficiaries of this new life were women. The 1920s were a period of liberation for women due to increased social freedom, legal rights, and economic opportunities. The societal evolution in the 1920s is…

    • 1006 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The shape of the world would have changed quite a bit if not for the influence of the two feminists. Anthony campaigned hard for women’s suffrage, forming an organization for her feminist cause. Without her and her group, women may not have voted across America for another fifty years at least. Anthony was so influential to the nation, Carrie Chapman Catt, the woman who took over Anthony’s suffrage organization, the National American Woman Suffrage Organization, said about her predecessor,“Her 86 years measure a movement whose results have been more far-reaching in the change of conditions, social, civil and political, than those of any war of revolution since history began,” (Kendall, 110). Anthony worked very hard to earn the right for women to enroll at Rochester University.…

    • 1170 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays