An Analysis Of Willy Loman's Tragedy

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The Succession of Willy Loman’s Tragedy It was once said that one flap of a butterflies’ wings can be enough to cause a hurricane. This proverb holds true in the nature of cause and effect in social interactions, warning one to be aware of how actions can cause rash outcomes. Arthur Miller follows the disappointments of his troubled character’s last legs in his play, Death of a Salesman. The play ends with the suicidal death of his character named Willy, inducing readers to point fingers at who is to blame. No one character must bear the entirety of the blame but it is upon multiple characters that were closely related to Willy. Responsibility is laid on Biff because his lack of success drove his father into a sense of failure; Howard, when …show more content…
Howard, his boss, obliterates this dream and in doing so takes away Willy’s drive to live. When Willy was deciding upon his career he saw a man named Dave Singleman be successful, working hard even in his old age, living the dream that Willy thus claimed as his own. Willy is discouraged after he feels he is unable to continue on in his current position, a travelling salesman. In order to resolve this he pays a visit to Howard, requesting a change in position. Despite his promises; the respectable ties Willy had to his father and; seniority, he denies Willy the honour he deserves and fires him. Willy summarizes Howard’s wrong in stating, “You can’t eat the orange and throw the peel away – a man is not a piece of fruit” (Miller 61, 62). Willy is angry that Howard will not place him in a more suitable position as he requests but rather discards him with no regard to the respect he deserves or the seniority entitled to him. He essentially takes away the last strands of hope Willy has in himself: he had hoped to work and provide for himself just as Dave had. It was in Howard’s hands to help Willy achieve his lifelong goal, out of respect to his father’s wishes and to his own promise. Rather than giving Willy any hope in doing everything in his power to find him a placement, Howard holds no personal attachment and sends him to his …show more content…
Howard is at fault in firing him but in response to Willy’s desperation he points a finger at Willy’s sons saying, “Where are your sons? ... You go to your sons and you tell them that you’re tired” (Miller 63). Howard feels it is Willy’s son’s responsibility to provide for their father, and feels he himself does not hold any duty to Willy. Be that as it may, Biff does not feel he can help Willy. He succumbs himself to believe he is unable to discipline himself according his father’s ways of success. Once he comes to terms with this, Biff sees himself helping most by walking away and leaving the burden on Linda. He reasons with Linda, “… That way it’ll be off your mind and you can start brightening up again ….” (Miller 102). Further, Linda will not bring herself to confront Willy, unable to bear the load herself. She remains stubborn to believe he just needs to rest and have some space, and in the end never taking action. Though she is unable to confront Willy she is able bring herself to accuse her son, Biff of being the cause for Willy’s distress, as well as Howard, imagining all would be better once Willy had a better placement at the firm and his son by his side. In the midst of the blame being cast about in this web, Willy has justified

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