The Successful Effects Of Pearl Harbor And World War II

762 Words 4 Pages
Almost 74 years ago to date, Pearl Harbor located in Oahu, Hawaii, was maliciously attacked by the Japanese empire. It was a terrifying tragedy that ultimately forced the United States into World War II, the second world-wide war in a 25 year period. The United States had made a good effort to stay neutral during World War II, though we clearly sided with the Allies. The United States wanted to remain having the option of selling and trading goods with any country. During World War I, the United States lost approximately 117,000 men and women, though mostly men, and spent over 27 billion dollars. Because of the damaging effects of World War I, the U.S. was not interested in getting involved for another world war and cleaning up Europe’s disorder. …show more content…
The United States also added a provision to the Neutrality Act of 1937, which allowed the U.S. to sell materials to European forces, but only those willing to pay up front and provide transport of the goods sold. The provision was known as the Cash and Carry. In 1940 tensions were increasing between Japan and the United States. June 1940 President Roosevelt ordered the relocation our main fleet of naval ships and aircraft carriers from California to Pearl Harbor. This move was to demonstrate the power of the U.S. Navy and hopefully deter increasing Japanese …show more content…
Admiral Husband E. Kimmel of the Navy, and Lt General Walter C. Short of the Army, were in command of the naval fleet and ground troops at the time. The location of the base, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, made it a prime target for the Japanese attack. The attack of Pearl Harbor occurred on December 7, 1941. The first low-flying Japanese plane was spotted by Lt. Commander Logan C. Ramsey at 7:45 A.M. Ramsey spotted the plane dropping a bomb. He immediately ordered an uncoded telegraph message to go out to every ship and base: AIR RAID PEARL HARBOR – THIS IS NO DRILL. The attack lasted approximately 110 minutes, from 7:55 to 9:45

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