The Success Of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal

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The United States was facing a great controversy with the depression going on in the late 1920’s. It was the most devastating economic downturn that the western industrialized world had ever faced. It caused nearly half of America’s banks to fail, and over 13 million people were unemployed by 1933. In order to combat these tremendous issues, President Franklin Roosevelt would have to create a set of programs impactful enough to face it. When the New Deal was active in the fall of 1932, it would be the start of the return of the United States’ economy. Roosevelt acted quickly to provide support and stability to those in distress. The New Deal was arguably one of the best set of economic and social reforms ever made in U.S. Presidential history. …show more content…
It was a work relief program that would provide jobs to young unemployed, and unmarried men. It provided unskilled, manual jobs to these men. The job opportunities were related to conserving natural resources in lands owned by the government such as planting trees, or constructing parks. The CCC provided food and shelter for those that came to work, and were paid $30 a month, majority of it going to their families back at their homes. Overall, the CCC planted over 3 billion trees, created 3,470 fire towers, created drainage systems for over 84 million acres of agricultural land, and built around 800 …show more content…
During his first hundred days, he proved to be effective at improving the nation. The president had four priorities for America. They were getting America back to work, protecting their savings, provide relief for the old and elderly, and to industry and agriculture back to where they were before the Great Depression. Roosevelt knew that this was only the beginning of the United States’ rebirth. More changes would have to be made in order to fully recover and get on with development of America. In 1935, President Franklin Roosevelt would launch a second set of programs, ones that would be even more effective than the First New Deal. Roosevelt now knew how he could improve this new set of programs by looking upon the mistakes of the First Hundred Days. With careful analysis, he would be able to employ millions of people and provide upkeep for

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