The Success And Failure Of Reconstruction: Success Or Success?

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Register to read the introduction… The success or failure of Reconstruction may have been one of the most controversial questions in all of history because the answer cannot be justified. The solution to the success or failure of Reconstruction depended on the intent of the matter. Based on the fact of the reunification of the Union, Reconstruction may be considered a success for accomplishing this goal. On the other hand, Reconstruction may also be recognized as a failure if the main idea revolved around the equality of the blacks. The situation regarded both aspects of Reconstruction. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that this time period should not be labeled as a “failure” or a “success” because these are just arbitrary terms to define whether the conflict was good or bad which is solely a matter of opinion. Some of the intentions of Reconstruction were fulfilled, while other conditions of the Union remained the same. Many aspects of Reconstruction contributed to the success of the United States, but leaning towards the dissenting argument would be more legitimate. Reconstruction failed because blacks were not given complete equality when the Union troops retreated from the southern states. Many acts and tactics passed during this time show the …show more content…
“In 1790, a thousand tons of cotton was being produced every year in the South. By 1860, it was a million tons.” When Congress called for the abolishment of slavery, thousands of southern farmers lost money because of the decline of laborers who used to do the job for them. The farmers could no longer live off what they earned because of the dropped prices of crops. The infuriated southerners decided to abuse the freed slaves which began the corruption and chaos in the …show more content…
In 1866, the Civil Rights Act issued by the Republicans insured that blacks had equal rights. Being a former Tennessean, President Johnson, vetoes the bill to try to help his Democrat friends in the South. However, this bill became the first to be passed over a president’s veto. This act most likely became one of the most significant successes of Reconstruction, but as always, the South did not strictly enforce these laws. Along with the Civil Rights Act, Congress passed the Fourteenth Amendment allowing all US-born people the right to be equal. The following year in 1867, Congress passed the Fifteenth Amendment which became confirmed officially in 1869. The amendment prevented voting restrictions due to race. Hiram Revels, a black senator, became the first out of sixteen blacks to be elected to Congress. This portion of Reconstruction succeeded for the most part, but something had to be done to stop the South from disobeying the

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