The Stress Response Model

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The second axis that comprises the stress response stage is the neuroendocrine (fight or flight) axis, which causes intermediate stress effects (Everly & Lating 2013). First, the body engages in a fight or flight response in the presence of a perceived threat, and the primary organ involved in this is process is the adrenal medulla (Everly & Lating, 2013). Next, at the time of this publication, researchers had identified that the dorsomedial amygdlar complex as the utmost point for which the fight or flight response occurred (Everly & Lating, 2013). Originating there, neural impulses subsequently travel to the hypothalamic region, then the thoracic spinal cord, convene at the celiac ganglion, and then inhibit the adrenal medulla (Everly …show more content…
Such organ systems include but are not limited to the gastrointestinal system, cardiovascular system, and immune system (Everly & Lating, 2013). Once target organ activation occurs and results in disease-related symptoms, Everly & Lating (2013) argued that individuals may experience cognitive and behavioral changes, which could potentially facilitate subsequent neurological triggering and stress-response …show more content…
One major stressor that most individuals will experience is grief and bereavement. To further elaborate on the human stress response, specifically about the physiological affects of bereavement, Porter (1999) discussed how physiological responses to bereavement can be responsible for causing illnesses (Porter, 1999). First, she defined bereavement as an objective experience and grief as a subjective experience (Porter, 1999). The subjective component is how some individuals experience symptoms of grief, e.g., some are able to overcome them, some are not able to overcome the symptoms, and some will not experience many symptoms at all (Porter,

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