Cognitive Therapy Model

Good Essays
There are a wide array of therapies that therapists have found to be successful and have found to be useful for themselves when working with their own clients. As a therapist grows, they use different therapy methods and learn more about each one to find which one works best for them and the type of counseling they do, and the clients they work with on a daily basis. When learning whether a therapy model will work for the clients that a therapist will be working with, it is important to learn the history of that theory, the strengths and weaknesses, and the types of problems that this theory is the most useful in helping during sessions. Cognitive behavior therapy is one of these therapy models that will be discussed in greater detail.
Cognitive
…show more content…
These principles are supposed to integrate the practices of Buddhism 's mindfulness and the acceptance of Freudian psychotherapy. Another form of the third wave cognitive behavior therapy is the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, or also known as ACT. This theory relies on strategies that use acceptance and contact with the present moment, and mindfulness. It also focuses on thoughts and emotions along with overt behaviors. While cognitive behavior therapy attempts to change the content of the cognition, ACT focuses on changing the relationship to the process of thinking completely. While ACT is a useful therapy, cognitive behavior theorists have argued that this third wave idea of cognitive behavior therapy is unnecessary because cognitive behavior therapy has not held much different views of acceptance, mindfulness, and non-judgmental awareness from the beginning. This history is useful for seeing how cognitive behavioral therapy began and will be helpful when it comes to figuring out what types of problems this theory is the most useful to use it …show more content…
Cognitive behavioral therapy is beneficial for issues dealing mainly with depression, anxiety, personality disorders, and many others including eating and substance use disorders. (Corey, 2013) According to Claudi L.H. Bockting, Major Depressive Disorder is predicted to become the second on the list of major diseases by the year 2030 and a major contribution to medical costs as well. (Bockting, 2010, p.273) One specific training method used in cognitive behavior therapy for the treatment of depression is referred to as CWD-A, and operates on the Lewinsohn’s behavioral model. This model focuses on the emotions, thoughts, and behaviors that balance each other, and sees depression as a response to stress. This model engages the client in learning cognitive and behavioral skills in order for them to improve their coping skills. (Curry & Hersh, 2014, p. 17) CWD-A has been found to be a successful form of the cognitive behavior therapy model according to Curry and Hersh. It was also found that cognitive behavioral therapy

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    In cognitive therapy, the counselor works together with the client in order to help their change their maladaptive thinking patterns and behaviors that interfere with the client’s goal (Sharf, 2012l p.379). Cognitive therapy has a big emphasis in having a positive caring relationship with clients. I believe that in order to be successful with any client, a caring relationship that is established from building rapport and trust is needed. Cognitive therapy sees that as very essential in order to work with a client. One skill of cognitive therapy that I find very useful is self-monitoring.…

    • 748 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    CBT sees the process of change as a relatively short-term process. Psychodynamic theory on the other hand, is a long term process of change. While both aim to reduce symptoms and distress, perhaps the most central difference between CBT and psychodynamic therapy is that psychodynamic therapy tries to get at why you feel or behave the way you do by uncovering deeper and often unconscious motivations for feelings and behavior. CBT educates clients to identify dysfunctional thought patterns, perceptions, and behavior and replace them with more realistic ones in order to alter behavior and emotions. Despite the…

    • 1047 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    What I learned in this course In this course, I completed reading the text Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy written by Gerald Corey, which helped me have a better understanding of different types of theories and how they can benefit or help potential clients I may have. From all the theories studied in this course, there are some theories that I would like to apply that would be beneficial in helping me guide my clients to the right path. Person-centered therapy: In this therapy, Carl Roger recommended that the client would have the best help if the therapist motivates the client to concentrate on the problem then on the interpretation that others have on the situation. To have good results Carl Roger believed…

    • 1243 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Cognitive Behavioral Theory As An Ideal Form of Therapy CBT Basics Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a short-term, goal-oriented therapy treatment that focuses on the relationship between thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and how each influences the other (Buchalter, 2015). The goal of CBT is for clients to learn about and identify their patterns and modes of thinking in order to change their cognitive processes (Rubin, 2001). CBT focuses on the belief that thoughts cause feelings and behaviors, so by altering how a person thinks and changing negative thinking into positive thinking, they can alter maladaptive behaviors and responses (Kerr, 2015). One’s thoughts often hold patterns which emerge from negative thoughts, which are called…

    • 1120 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This is why I chose to use the Emotion-focused therapy model to assess Stan's case. This approach is used to help clients who lack skills on how to deal with emotions and helps them to strengthen themselves by attending to their emotional experiences…

    • 1249 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The key therapeutic interventions used in Psychoanalysis are free association, interpretation, analysis of transference, resistance and dreams, and projective tests (e.g. TAT, Rorschach Inkblot Test, human figure drawings). On the other hand, in Cognitive Therapy, the techniques used could be forceful disputing, reality testing, chasing cognitive distortions, and identifying automatic thoughts. Unlike Psychoanalysis, Cognitive Therapy is directive and goal oriented and does not look at the client’s past, which some people may consider a disadvantage arguing that if the root of the problem is not treated, the symptom or behavior will eventually reoccur. Likewise, in Psychoanalysis there is a danger that the client could become dependent on their therapist whereas in Cognitive Therapy the client is taught to be…

    • 1347 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Cognitive psychology focuses on how we process information that influences our behavior (McLeod, 2007). This more modern and popular therapy was developed from the cognitive perspective such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). This form of psychotherapy focuses on our thoughts that influence our feelings and behaviors. CBT is known to treat a broad range of disorders including depression. In my opinion, cognitive behavioral therapy would be a perfect fit for Sylvia.…

    • 726 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Goal Setting In Counseling

    • 1050 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Goal setting In this case, I would like to use the cognitive behavioral approach to help the client, Wai. There are several cognitive behavioral approached, including the rational emotional behavioral therapy (REBT), cognitive therapy (CT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Arnkoff & Glass (1992) pointed out that all of the cognitive behavioral approach share the same basic chrematistics and assumptions. Firstly, the client and the therapist have the collaborative relationship. Secondly, the therapist assume that the psychological distress is because of the disturbance in cognitive proves.…

    • 1050 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Therefore, CBT group therapy would be an extremely useful technique for caregivers of individuals suffering from schizophrenia. Not only would the techniques help modulate any feelings of anxiety, depression, or stress that are being presented in the group, but they can carry over to other areas of caregiving. As with the research above, skills could be taught to caregivers to relieve acute stress and psychological distress as well instill feelings of confidence and success as a caregiver following…

    • 1466 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A counselor is trained to handle such problems and oftentimes have expansive experience helping other clients with similar difficulties. The counselor can assure the client that the problems that he or she faces are not unusual they can build the plan for the next steps, a strong support system and accountability is formed. This is partly why psychotherapy…

    • 838 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays