The Stolen Generations Summary

Superior Essays
The effects of the plot of the stolen generations.

During the years between 1905 and 1969 aboriginal and Torres strait islander children were forcibly taken from their families and put in government institutions or missions where many were abused mentally, physically and sexually. Poor living conditions were also common, and most children grew up almost entirely without affection or knowing that their parents even existed. This resulted in one of the biggest losses of culture in human history, as indigenous parents could not teach their children the way of life and tradition that had been the basis of their culture for tens of thousands of years. Because of this indigenous children grew up not knowing anything about the history of their people
…show more content…
Indigenous parents were also affected, some could not go on living without their children, and though they tried to find them children were given new names and birth dates upon entering government …show more content…
Father of children that were taken during the plight of the stolen generations, Donald Collard, states that; “For a long while after the children were removed Sylvia[Donald 's wife] and I gave up on life and maybe a little on each other.” This was the case with many indigenous parents whose children had been stolen, and Many turned to substance abuse as a coping mechanism. Having their children take tore apart many indigenous families as traditional family life could not continue with so many members of the family missing. Children were sometimes even taken at birth, and a pillow was used as a barrier in the delivery room so that the mothers could not make any maternal contact with the baby, or even get a glimpse of their child. Many mother could not say if their child was a boy or a girl because of this. Many children 's names and birth dates were changed upon being taken, and this made it nearly impossible for indigenous parents to find them again, and often if they eventually found them they were refused contact with the child, or the child was taken so young that they could not recognise or remember their parents. Indigenous parents did not sign any papers to agree to sending their children away, and although the government often implied that it was because they were in a bad family environment and had to be taken away this was usually not

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The Stolen Generation

    • 1020 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Stolen Generation During the stolen generation, many Indigenous children were taken away from their families and put in institution and foster homes where they were forced to “become white”. Aboriginal culture was largely lost because an entire generation was taken away, this meant that there was no one to carry on cultural traditions. Despite the horrific times the stolen generation went through, the government and community has came together to try and resolve the loss of culture. Children of the stolen generations were made to feel ashamed of their culture meaning indigenous heritage has been largely lost. The children of the Stolen Generation were put into institutions and foster homes where they received discrimination and were forced…

    • 1020 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Many of the kids who suffer will grow up with so much turbulence that they will create turbulence in the rest of society. The children who are in long term foster care will have little to no respect for American authority or authority in general because they may feel that because our nation did not care about them. Then why should they care about the nation? This is a thought that Lisa had about herself, but many foster children will blame their trauma and the unavailability to be able to receive help for their problems on the…

    • 1777 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The children grew up losing their cultural identity of what it meant to be a native and were traumatized from these experiences. Sometimes the suppression of language and culture was so severe in residential schools that Aboriginal children were not able to communicate with their parents and and other Elders when they left Residential schools (ibid 193). Aboriginal children were…

    • 1297 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    All the children were put into different foster homes because no home could accommodate for all the children. This separation has made some of children have behavior issues resulting in criminal activity. Now several of the children have been sent to emergency shelters because no foster parent will accept a child with a bad background. One of the children has moved more than 15 times. This has made me realize that in this case separating the children has caused more harm than good.…

    • 776 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the 1900s thousands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were dispossessed and put into missions. The act of dispossession is to forcibly remove an Indigenous person from their land, this is what happened to these children, but not only were they removed from their land, but also their families. This was extremely harmful to the children as although they gained a higher education than many other Indigenous people they missed out on learning about their cultural heritage, which is a fundamental part of Indigenous identity. Claire Henty-Gebert’s social and cultural identities have been negatively affected through the removal of her from her family and the moving around she had to do as she grew up in the mission she was placed…

    • 1272 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Shame And Stigma Essay

    • 1184 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Several schools refused admission to they child, they had a lot of misperceptions about children with autism and they were not equipped to handle such children. The parents were very confused about whether to send the child to a mainstream school or a special school and how to decide what to do. Mother’s Vs Father’s. Women have traditionally carried the overwhelming responsibility of physical and emotional care giving in families. One father of a child with autism did not let his wife to be interviewed.…

    • 1184 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The native children were taken from the families against their own will and they were taken to boarding schools, where they were physically, sexually and emotionally abused. They had no voice and no one they could turn to they could trust. They had to work in farms, sewing and cooking that children should not have been doing. They were never shown or felt loved and resulted to drugs and alcohol abuse. The new way of life was marked in to the Native American kids’ lives.…

    • 428 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    "In 2005, an estimated 1,460 children died as a result of abuse or neglect (USDHHS, 2007)." Single parents are often stressed out from playing both roles (mother and father) and some from living in poverty trying to make a way being able to provide for their child. These things result to parents becoming addicted to alcohol and drug which can cause them to neglect their child and abuse them. 70 percent of substance abuse is the reason for the reported neglect and abuse cases. "As of September 30, 2004, 517,000 children lived in foster homes because they could not safely remain in their own homes.…

    • 1335 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    With that being said, for me, many families failed to protect their relatives living in Willowbrook. They did not inquire or visited their family members often enough to know what was happening to them, the causes of their bruises, the lack of hygiene, or the precariousness of the place. This is supported by Bernard testimony when he stated “I suffered and no one cared for me. My family only visited me every 5-10 years (Fisher, 2015). Moreover, the abuse was allowed because many families were not able to handle the shame of having a defective child as part of their family.…

    • 698 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Preventing Child Abuse

    • 1194 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Society looks at child abuse as a problem that will be handled by law enforcement or the parents of the children, but in reality most people just turn the other way if they see a child or children being yelled at, slapped, or exploited by their parents or guardians. A case that happened recently was where the husband failed to stop or report the abuse his wife was doing to their adopted daughter. The wife tried to sew the daughter’s mouth shut, gouge her eyes out, and choked the girl until she blacked out. The husband knew for at least four years and did not tell the police or even stop it himself; he said that it was a type of discipline to punish the child. What should have been done was when the child started to be abused, he should have either stopped his wife or told the authorities.…

    • 1194 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays