The Stigma And Discrimination Of HIV And AIDS

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HIV and AIDS are most often used terms by many people considering them to have the same meaning, but in real they are two interchangeable terms for the same condition. HIV and AIDS are totally different. “HIV” stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus which causes or develops into Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome – “AIDS” in the later stages of the HIV infection. HIV is a virus with the main mode of transmission as blood, semen, vaginal fluid, rectal mucous and breast milk. HIV does not mean that the individual has or will be certain to develop AIDS. However, if left untreated most people have great chances to eventually develop AIDS. A person who is infected with HIV is mentioned as being HIV positive (HIV+). It is impossible to look at an …show more content…
Stigma not only makes it more difficult for individuals trying to cope up with HIV and manage their disease condition on a personal level, but it also interfers with attempts to fight HIV/AIDS epidemic. On a personal level it can make individuals unwilling to access HIV testing followed by appropriate treatment and care (NZAF).

Factors that lead to HIV/AIDS related stigma and discrimination include:
• HIV/AIDS being a life threatening disease make people react to the disease or the individual in strong ways.
• HIV infection is already associated with behaviours such as homosexuality, drug addiction, prostitution that are already stigmatised in many communities, societies and religious beliefs.
• Sex being the main reason for HIV infection in most cases which often questions the moral values.
• Inaccurate information regarding the disease being transmitted , leading to absurd behaviour and misperceptions about the disease and its
…show more content…
The effects of stigma usually convolutes decisions about testing, disclosure of the status and ability to mediate the prevention measures to be followed. The stigma has had a subtle effect on the epidemic’s course. An aversion to take HIV test leads to higher number of individuals being diagnosed in the later stage where the virus has already advanced into the AIDS stage. This makes treatment measures less effective causing early death (HIV/AIDS Stigma & Discrimination,

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