The Stereotypes Of Violence And Violence In Africa

Amazing Essays
Africa is typically thought of as being a continent full of violence and revolution. This concept may have originated from the poor treatment of Africans by the rest of the world through colonization, forced labor in Africa, and the enslaving of Africans in other regions of the world. The danger and violence that stemmed from many countries gaining independence and experiencing political upheaval has been thwarted by peacekeeping efforts from outside agencies, like the United Nations. Africa has had a violent past, but only because of the exploitation by the Europeans, and eventually Americans. Ultimately, their ethnocentrism led to violence and the stereotype of danger in Africa. In order to determine whether or not there is a still a strong …show more content…
Approximately 12 million Africans were traded across the Atlantic, however, the number of slaves originally bought was much higher. The passage from Africa to North America had a very high mortality rate. (Segal 4) If Africans reached their destinations alive, they were used to fulfil a labor shortage in the new American colonies. Because many crops could not be grown in Europe, agriculture was a necessary industry in the colonies, and this required more labor than the colonists could supply. Unsurprisingly, forcibly removing someone from their home and enslaving them to work on another continent, if they did not die on the dangerous trip there, does not foster peaceful relationships. This tension, built upon hostilities over colonization, and other poor treatment of African people, has helped contribute to the violence in Africa in the past. Furthermore, it is clear Europeans, and in turn, Americans, have always had a superiority complex towards Africans. This would lead to views of Africans as being inferior, which can lead to ideas of them being less civilized, and more dangerous. This compounds on the actual violence in Africa, and results in the world viewing the entire continent and African population as violent and …show more content…
For example, a survey for the period 1990–2000 compiled by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime ranked South Africa second for assault and murder (by all means) per capita and first for rapes per capita in a data set of 60 countries (NationMaster 1). In addition, there are still 15 countries either at war, or experiencing post-war conflicts in Africa (United Nations 2). However, comparing Africa to the rest of the world this way ignores the ways Europe hindered African development in the past. Many African countries are still developing, and should not be held to the same standard as developed first world countries. When modern day Africa is compared to its own history, there has been great progress. There are far fewer political conflicts and civil wars, and there is much more outside assistance than in the past. Africa’s violence today consists more of domestic violence than the political upheaval and genocides of the past. Though Africa still has a long way to go, it has also come extremely far, despite the obstacles it already had to

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    The African culture was decimated because of their savage ways of life. All countries and bodies of power that claimed their piece of Africa justified their hostility by educating a ferocious nation. They needed to provide for their mother countries or strong powers and because the African were a weaker people, it was their destiny to fall and not evolve due to their unfit nature. Other regions that were impacted by the African slave trade include… They were impacted by … The devastating impacts of the African slave trade still outlast the country and have…

    • 1255 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As aforementioned, slave trade caused for a changed perception of guns and violence. Many Africans evolved to believe that killing other Africans or enslaving them was the right thing to do, at least to make money that is (M’bokolo 151). Due to the constant influx of Europeans, some European culture spread to Africa. It introduced new ideas to African society, such as Christianity (“Impact of Slave Trade”). Slavery also created a poorer image of African society.…

    • 1014 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In addition, Africans are seen as savages that could turn on one another at any minutes. This stereotype is caused by the misunderstanding of civil wars in Africa. In their texts titled “Concerning Violence”, “The Politics of Naming: Genocide, Civil War, Insurgency,”, “The African Roots of War,” and “Maps”, authors Franz Fannon, Mahmood Mamdani, W.E.B. DuBois, and Nuruddin Farah write of wars in Africa. The naming…

    • 1961 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Chesapeake Colonies Dbq

    • 1019 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This instance, in the Chesapeake, is similar to the civil war in that it caused the issues; “But as the number of Africans in their midst increased … white colonists reacted remorselessly to this supposed racial threat” confirms the resentment whites in the Chesapeake (and in the South in general) had for African slaves (Kennedy 74). We still have much racism today, because it is imbedded into our culture. We are still trying to shake off our imperfections. We are still not determined by our…

    • 1019 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The disturbance of the slave trade was massive: the connections between kingdoms and the overall social hierarchies were changed. In some decentralized social orders, individuals advanced new styles of leadership that prompted more inflexible, progressive structures, thought to better guarantee security. What 's more, European forces interceded in the political process to prevent the uprise of the African centralized societies that would have hampered their operations. Additionally, doubt and abnormal state of mind among African tribes happened as the Africans were catching and offering their own particular people into slavery to take care of the Europeans high demand for slaves. Numerous African societies had varied dialects, because of the strong influence of the Europeans.…

    • 1218 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This hatred stemmed not from natural instinct but instead had been carefully cultivated through propaganda and threats. This can be seen in R.W. Johnson’s, SOUTH AFRICA A BRAVE NEW WORLD, in which it is stated that, “One was told, ‘the country would burn’ and there would be ‘blood on the streets’.” (Johnson 2009). This kind of threatening diatribe did not aid in giving a fair view of the black population but rather drove the white population to start associating black people with death and danger. A concept introduced within the white community, ‘Die Swart Gevaar’ created a literal fear of black people, insinuating that they are a race to be wary of (Koen 2013).…

    • 2081 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Due to Armah’s background of writing about “corruption…in contemporary Africa,” ("Ayi Kwei Armah | Ghanaian Writer,” n.d). The Healers contains various examples of materialistic characters as well as communities. Unfortunately, the settlers have corrupt society to the point where forceful…

    • 1682 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Politically, European imperialism created tremendous conflict among African people, expanded Europe’s colonial boundaries by carving up Africa, and attempted to restructure society, only to leave Africa’s political structure weak and corrupt. Economically, European imperialism destructed Africa’s self sufficiency and increased dependance on colonial powers; strengthened Europe’s own economy, therefore further weakening Africa’s economy; and exploited many raw materials within Africa. Culturally, European imperialism uprooted Africa’s spiritual and traditional values, exploited the people of Africa, and prompted colonial racism. Works Cited Barnes, Andrew. “Economic Parasitism: European Rule In West Africa, 1880-1960.” International Journal of African Historical Studies Vol.…

    • 1743 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The transatlantic slave trade was a horrific occurrence that had a great impact on the black experience between the 1400s and 1800s. The impact resulting from the trade had negative effects on the the black experience because africans were belittled and torment. On the other hand, the slave trade also had a positive impact on the black experience because gave rise to the power mindsets of frican individuals. The slave trade had a negative impact on the black experience due to the conditions and lifestylels in which the africans had to live, if they even…

    • 710 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Since Kurt was in Congo for a mission of transforming Native population from savagery to civilization, he needed to overpower them in order for them to change, they use brutality to change their ways of thinking and doing hoping and maintaining to raise their culture among them. Race is also performed through imperialism in a way that whites do not take notice of the black’s existence, they believe that they are miner minded than them and they are full of savagery that why their place is so dark according to the novella’s title.Power and race relate through imperialism in such a way that, when you look to this novella open minded you will see that if power was not possessed for the success of imperialism race also was not going to be performed in a way that the author reveal be. If the white did not have to be cruelty when maintaining imperialism, need for power was not going to be necessary, because everyone was going to agree or disagree about the change. The blacks were not going to be exploited in racism because every single person was going to do what he or she thinks is right for…

    • 1272 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays