Gender Stereotypes In Poniewozik's Cinderella And Princess Culture

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According to Disney, and many people in society, Cinderella, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, and Pocahontas along with many others are all considered princesses. The glamour and beauty these princesses depict in their movies can be defined as princess culture. As young girls grow up it is not uncommon for them to admire this princess culture. However, in today's society the stereotyping of young girls is recurring and sometimes considered discriminatory. Some feminists may argue that young girls shouldn’t be subjected to a typical “girly” childhood but instead they should be more individualistic. James Poniewozik, author of “The Princess Paradox”, and Peggy Orenstein, author of “Cinderella and Princess Culture”, share a common frustration that …show more content…
She suggests that reducing gender stereotypes and princess culture at a younger age will result in girls feeling individualistic and empowered. Orenstein writes, “If trafficking in stereotypes doesn’t matter at 3, when does it matter? At 6? Eight? Thirteen?” (Orenstein 327). Orenstein believes young girls posing as figures from movies, toys, or television, is potentially unhealthy for their self esteem as they grow older. Orenstein states princess movies may cause girls to grow up expecting a glamourous life without realizing the hard work that it takes. Orenstein believes parents should subject young girls to less princesses so girls grow up thinking realistically. On the contrary, Orenstein suggests that princess culture in a young girls childhood may not be causing any damage at all, but instead it sets them up for a bright future. Orenstein gets insight from Andy Moony, a Disney consumer specialist, on princesses and their impact on younger girls. Mooney said, “‘I see girls expanding their imagination through visualizing themselves as princesses, and then they pass through that phase and end up becoming lawyers, doctors, mothers or princesses, whatever the case may be’”(Orenstein 329). The reason Orenstein provides this contradicting evidence is to inform consumers that princesses can potentially set young girls up for a successful future. As there is no concrete evidence that princess culture harms a girls self esteem, Orenstein still believes in order for young girls to feel empowered in society, parents should reduce the frequency of princesses in a young girls

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