The Social Structure Theory In Juvenile Delinquency

Good Essays
The social structure theory is a theory of the haves and the have nots. The well off versus those struggling. Age does not play much of a factor in this theory as it is applied to all age ranges. Focusing on the economic status as the primary factor to the contribution of crime, it adheres that one’s need to compete for the American dream. With conformity being the primary mode of adaptation, while all other modes are cynical the American dream is always just out of reach.
The developmental theory translates loosely that kids will be kids, and as they age they will mature and do away with their childish tendencies. The theory recognizes the mental instability of adolescents giving them somewhat of a pass on their behavior. “As Richard Restak (2001) put it, ‘The immaturity of the adolescent’s behavior is perfectly mirrored by the immaturity of the adolescent’s brain’ (p.76).” (Walsh 339) Citing self-control or
…show more content…
Observing juveniles at their onset stage to crime, monitoring the transition zones where social changes led to an increase in juvenile delinquency. “In their analysis of Cook County Juvenile Court records spanning the years from 1900 to 1933, Shaw and McKay (1972) noted that the majority of delinquents always came from the same neighborhoods. This suggested the existence of natural areas that facilitated crime and delinquency independent of other factors.” (Walsh 143)
Flowing in with the developmental theory that low income families tend to live in poorer areas with more affordability. “It is typical for risk (and protective) factors to cluster together. A single parent family, for instance, is a risk factor that can lead to low socioeconomic status and the financial necessity to reside in socially disorganized neighborhoods where children interact with antisocial peers.” (Walsh

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Youth Crime

    • 1329 Words
    • 6 Pages

    A risk assessment study and protective factors in child crime revealed that single-parent households, families with many children and divorced parents are all risk factors for juvenile delinquency. A combination of more siblings, the less parental influence and greater partnerships between antisocial peers have been attributed to higher delinquencies. Parenting practices. Sampson and Laub (1993) identified four factors that predicted parenting juvenile delinquency. These include erratic discipline and hard practices, lack of parental supervision, parental rejection, and weak bonds between parents and…

    • 1329 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The disparities among minority prison populations are easily traced to culture, communities, and changing population demographics. They are not caused by an unfair or bias justice system. There are many key factors that explain disparity among minority populations in prisons? First, statistics show that there is a higher concentration of minorities in lower income, largely populated deprived communities. The criminal activity is starting at such a young age and compounding from generation to generation.…

    • 1212 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In 2011, black youth were two hundred and sixty- nine percent more likely to be arrested for violating curfew laws than white youth.” Along with curfew violations, focusing on property offenses, youth of color were more than 2.5 times as likely to be arrested in comparison to white youth (Rovner). Since the early eighties, arrest rates among youths have dropped sufficiently, but the gap between non-minorities and minorities is still widely varied. The various influences that race implies can been seen in multiple areas when sending an adolescent through the criminal justice system. These effects can be either indirect or direct, and as a youth travels farther along through the system these effects and disparities may accumulate (Pope). In an…

    • 1544 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Many had to face serious charges for the crimes they committed. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has also reported some statistics on crime committed by minors. According to a journal called "Juvenile Delinquency," FBI director J. Edgar Hoover reports that people under the age of eighteen committed approximately: 53 percent of all car thefts, 49 Percent of all burglaries, 18 percent of all robberies, and 16 percent of all rapes. These statistics have suggested a youth crime wave as early as 1953 (239). As juvenile crime rate increases over the years, it brings into consideration that they are developing more as adults.…

    • 1428 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Clearly, recidivism can be decreased because there’s evident studies suggesting the do’s and don’ts in order to fight against repeated juvenile offenders. “Some studies have focused on how transfers negatively affect the maturation process of juveniles in mid-adolescence to late adolescence and interfere with their abilities to accomplish vital developmental tasks, thereby heightening their risk of failure once released from the justice system” (Hess, 2013,…

    • 1092 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This rebellion is spearheaded by a regression reminiscent of the Piaget’s preoperations stage where adolescents believe that the world revolves around them. Elkhart explains adolescent egocentrism as being defined by “imaginary audience” and “personal fable” (Belsky, 2012, p. 273). Imaginary audience is the adolescent’s belief that everyone concerns themselves with their actions, and personal fable is the adolescent’s belief that they are an exception to the rules, or invincible (Belsky, 2012, p. 273). It is a well-known fact that emotional instability affects our perceptions and reactions. Due to the hormonal changes occurring during adolescence, as well as the new experiences associated with evolving emotional emancipation, it is understandable why adolescents have questionable means of personal conveyance.…

    • 2086 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Unproductive parenting advances the chances of youth associating with delinquent peers. At the risk of overgeneralizing a difficult circumstance studies have found there is a direct connection between ineffective parenting and the trend of youth that communicate with…

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Juvenile Courts Essay

    • 2245 Words
    • 9 Pages

    When states decide to make juvenile transfers, the main factors that they look for are the offense and the age, but also the age of the juvenile at the time of the offense. The number of juveniles that are fifteen and younger that have been waived to criminal courts has doubled since 1985. The authors make it very clear that children who live in poverty are more likely to have contact with police at a young age and are more likely to be transferred to criminal courts. “…11 juvenile court jurisdictions reported a disproportionate number of juveniles in secure confinement came from low-income families” (Urban & Cooper…

    • 2245 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The capture rate for all offenses amongst juveniles achieved its highest peak in twenty years in 1996 and then declined 65% by 2014 (Juvenile arrest rates, n.d.). An investigation of 113 delinquent youth in a State confinement office found that 82 percent reported daily liquor and different drug usage, 14 percent used more than two times a week, and 4 percent reported irregular use prior to confinement (DeFrancesco, 1996). This research will discuss the link between juvenile justice and drug crime, juvenile crime that is related to drug use, effects of crime such as: poor family relationships; ill health; cognitive problems, and poor education, the role physical abuse has in juvenile delinquency, and conclude with a summary. A significant correlation exists between substance abuse and criminal practices in juveniles (Carter, 2012). Young delinquents show increased rates of substance abuse in contrast with non-offending juveniles (Carter, 2012).…

    • 792 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Age is a significant predictor; according to the literature younger juveniles are more likely to reoffend than older juveniles. Ethnicity is also found to be a strong predictor of recidivism in juveniles. Deep rooted mistrust of the police, courts and corrections in communities of color have particularly contributed to the overrepresentation of racial and ethnic minorities in the juvenile system. Gang affiliation, peer influences such as those received from membership in an exclusive group is also a predictive of juvenile recidivism, that can lead to violence. Gang affiliation is a negative social influence that is indicative of future criminal activity.…

    • 2249 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics