The Social Reercussions Of Human Rights Enforcement And Economic Development

1956 Words 8 Pages
The study of development is so often focused primarily on the economic sector of growth or lack thereof. In that, while we frequently discuss notions of power, the labour market, and various economic theorists - it is seldom acknowledged how living in these economic conditions affects the citizens on a human rights level. I am of the opinion that human rights enforcement and economic development need to occur hand-in-hand, to avoid instances of international exploitation and rights infringements. In order to best illustrate this point, I will be drawing on two primary theories and concepts, these include; globalization, and dependency theory. In conjunction with one another, we can adequately comprehend the social repercussions of economic …show more content…
However, before we delve deep into philosophical questions on the universality of human rights - let me state that for the purposes of this essay, and as per my own personal beliefs - that human rights are universal. This is not to say that I am ignorant to the cultural sensitiveness of human rights - but rather to state that I view human rights as a fundamental guarantee to all humans, regardless of race, gender, sexuality, disability, culture, religion, etc. In that, “human rights are inherent and inalienable in human beings, simply by the fact of their being human” (UN 2006, 5). However, this does not dismiss the fact that the execution of human rights does demand cultural sensitivity by its very …show more content…
In this theoretical framework, it is understood that ‘core’ countries (ie. developed countries such as Europe) have flourished as a direct result of the destruction of ‘periphery’ countries (ie. Third World countries) (Peet & Hartwick 2009, 166). In other words - much like our current capitalist system - the successful depend on the weakness and destruction of the poor. Andre Gunder Frank, while critically analysing the development theory, understood it to mean that the underdevelopment of periphery countries as a direct result of “loss of surplus expropriated for investment in the center’s development” (Peet & Hartwick 2009, 170). Following that train of thought, the only way to develop then is to emancipate the periphery from the core countries (Ibid). While this seems like a rather impossible goal, especially given today’s capitalist discourses in economics, the human rights violations that occur in periphery states cry for a more autonomous and equal system. In other words, a system that does not specifically favour certain countries at the expense of others. These human rights violations are so often “imposed on a country’s population from above, and those most adversely affected often have little or no input in its implementation” (Goodhart 2013,

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