The Similarities Of The Characters In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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In addition, how does the scenes in the films change the content and the personalities of the characters in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein? When I watched the movie of Frankenstein that published in 1931 and directed by James Whale, I recognized that there are differences between the novel and the film version. The first difference I noticed in Whale’s film is the names of the characters have been change and rearrange. For instance, the protagonist in the film is Henry Frankenstein instead of Victor Frankenstein. Henry Clerval, who is a friend of Victor Frankenstein in the novel has became Victor Moritz. One thing I found interesting is that the last name of Victor Moritz is same as the last name of Justine Moritz in the novel. Justine Moritz …show more content…
As an illustration, after Henry Frankenstein created the monster, he did not run away from the monster as Victor Frankenstein did in the novel. Instead, he does not relinquish and believes that his experiment is not a failure. He is testing on the monster’s physical responses in his lab and is trying to prove his success to professor Waldman. Henry Frankenstein is more optimistic in Whale’s film. On the other hand, Victor Moritz in the film always look anxious and worried after Henry Frankenstein told him about his experiment. Moritz also went to Elizabeth’s house and told her to help Frankenstein (Frankenstein). Accordingly, Whales makes a very interesting rearrangement of characters’ names and change their personalities which referring to Mary Shelley’s characters in the …show more content…
There was scene in James Whale’s movie which Henry Frankenstein’s servant, Fritz, is stolen brains from the University for Frankenstein to create the monster. But he accidently drops the “normal brain,” and thus he took away the “criminal brain” (Frankenstein). Whale has guided the audiences to the path where we already know the monster might be the antagonist of the film even before the monster existed. In the article “Approaches to Frankenstein [In Film]” by David Pirie, he points out “in the part Colin Clive [Henry Frankenstein] alternates unconvincingly between monomania and wooden riding-booted heroics, while Robert Florey’s ridiculous idea of giving the monster an accidental ‘criminal brain’ renders much of the story pointless and seriously undermines Karloff’s [the monster] magnificent performance” (Pirie 279). The plot that Whale set up in the beginning of the story is restricting and limiting Karloff’s (actor who cast the monster) performance in the film because we already know that the monster has a “criminal brain,” and he needs to act like that he has the gene of a “criminal.” It is also foreshadowing what will happen for the rest of the film. Furthermore, the lack of eloquence of the monster in the film is emphasizing his ugliness and violent. According

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