The Similarities Of Otto Von Bismarck And Adolf Hitler

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Two of the greatest men in modern history, Otto von Bismarck and Adolf Hitler were determined to transform Germany into a great power. Despite being Prussian, Bismarck was nonetheless driven to unify Germany due to the fear of liberal ideology in a fragmented Germany. In essence, Bismarck was violent and would not stop at anything until his goals were realized with the eventual formation of a German state. Meanwhile, Adolf Hitler, an Austrian, sought to rid the nation of any race that was not “pure,” creating a utopian society based upon his radical ideology. Like Bismarck, Hitler was close-minded and would always go with his instinct, regardless of what was truly in the best interest of the masses. However, these men differed particularly …show more content…
Whereas Bismarck promoted a more peaceful doctrine for German unification, Hitler sought the destruction of entire races to meet his goals. In fact, while Bismarck continued on a unification process centuries in the making, the ideology of Hitler was new to the German people. “But so far as what actually happened is concerned-not what might have happened-the evidence seems to leave no doubt. . . [none] comparable with that of Adolf Hitler. . .”(Bullock 1). In contrast, Otto von Bismarck united the German people, with it, maintaining good relations throughout the European continent. Although his regime was inherently violent to liberal protestation, he was able to maintain peace in the Confederation remarkably well. “Seven Weeks’ War was amazing in its brevity. Bismarck hastened to make peace before the other European powers could realize what had happened. . .”(Palmer 529). Although Hitler and Bismarck achieved their goals in completely different ways, each was successful in the attempt to change German …show more content…
Naturally, however, in German history, the wrongdoings of Hitler will always overshadow the good done during the unification of Germany years prior. Still, both leaders were harsh and stubborn in many ways, particularly Bismarck; “Although he cared for the world’s opinion, it never deterred him in his actions; criticism and denunciation left him untouched. . .”(Palmer 527). While this made Bismarck less personable, it nonetheless turned him into a great leader, one with fierce determination. From the writing of Mein Kampf in the early 20th century to his death in 1945, Hitler was never set off his path to the creation of a pure Aryan race. Both of these men’s ability to stay focused in a time of nation turmoil led to their success as leaders in their own

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