How Is Ariel Presented In Act 4 Of The Tempest

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The fragment belongs to Act 4, from the play The Tempest, written by William Shakespear. It was first represented in James I court in 1611. It is considered to be the last work of the author, and thus its literary testament. It belongs to a series of works known as “last plays”, in which the loss of possessions and status, exile, and reencounters, together with magical elements, were common characteristics. In the play, a situation is presented to us: an island, a ship in the sea, a terrible storm, and Prospero, who is causing it from said island, by making use of his magic. Prospero is the rightful Duke of Millaine (Milan), and was overthrown from power twelve years ago as a result of his brother's treason, together with the king's. His aim …show more content…
Ariel is a slave to Prospero, with the promise of being set free when his mater is fully satisfied and will not have any further use for him – promise which is eventually fulfilled by the end of the play. This submission started when Prospero set Ariel free from a tree where Sycorax, the witch who lived on the island, and mother to Caliban, had placed him. However, we can also appreciate, although differently, submission in Prospero's relationship with Caliban. The latter is considered a savage, a “devil”, as he was son to Sycorax, who was a witch, therefore meaning Caliban is the representation of an unrefined being who needs to be taught language and be nurtured, and whose wild nature does not allow him to be respected as a human being. He is a savage, and thus, this is enough justification for subduing him and enslaving …show more content…
In the lines 188 to 190, Prospero expresses his distress, as he believes Caliban's nature is not to be refined, as he is a “born devil”, and he may not have any nurture, deeming his efforts to teach and “civilise” him as useless, and therefore condemning him to slavery his entire life – as opposed to Ariel, to whom he commits to bestow his freedom, as he is the representation of art, being a magical creature, and whose nature allows him to nuture and learn all that his master, Prospero, teaches him until the moment he becomes

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