The Significance Of Death In Gilgamesh And Bhagavad Gita

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Death is an inevitable aspect that comes with life, but most people choose to ignore it because it can be both uncomfortable and fearful. The acceptance of death allows for you to make more out of life and to see things in a different perspective. This common theme of accepting death as a way to live a fulfilling life is even portrayed through works of literature. In both Gilgamesh and Bhagavad Gita, the heroes in the tales had to go on a journey–whether physical or internal– to come to the realization that death is inevitable and should be unfeared. Gilgamesh went on a journey in an effort to achieve immortality because he believed that beating death would prolong his ability to achieve great things. As opposed to the perspective from the …show more content…
Gilgamesh is the ruler of Uruk and he is “two thirds divine and one-third human,” making him capable of achieving extraordinary feats. He ruled his people in a tyrannical manner so the gods created an equal for him, Enkidu, and this balance brings peace to Uruk. They become true friends and venture to battle a monster by the name of Humbaba. At first, Gilgamesh was not fearful of death, instead he saw it as a reason to be more heroic so that he can leave a legacy behind. “Why be afraid then, since sooner or later death must come?” (Gilgamesh, p.93). Enkidu’s death was what sparked the transition for him to become fearful of death. The only person that resembled Gilgamesh was Enkidu, and him dying wasn’t only sad because he lost a true friend, but also because it made him realize that he can not escape death. His denial of death is what caused him to regress and to turn himself into a primitive being; being ignorant seemed more appealing than accepting death. Furthermore, this shows that accepting death contributes to your humanity. It was that rejection that caused Gilgamesh to turn into a wild man. This denial only increased his appetite to want to avoid death at all cost, thus causing him to go on a …show more content…
Arjuna was in the middle of a battle when he came to the realization that the people he would potentially kill are members of his family. This thought made his heart heavy with grief and he no longer wanted to continue the battle. Krishna, the divine god, explains to Arjuna that it’s only the physical body that actually dies, the soul lives on. “Death is certain for the born; for the dead, rebirth is certain. Since both cannot be avoided, you have no reason for your sorrow” (Bhagavad Gita, p.50). This quotation touches on the fact that lamenting over something that is unavoidable is not necessary. Krishna is referred to as the “Blessed Lord” and he is the person that Arjuna automatically turns to for advice, this portrays him as an omniscient character. Although as a god he has the ability to live forever, he is still cognizant of the fact that the wise thing for humans to do is to accept death and to continue to make contributions to the world regardless of how they are paid back. Furthermore, death is seen as a spiritual transition into a new life for the “Self” to continue its deeds, but just on a different physical form. Life itself is eternal, because it’s been here before birth and it will still be there after death. Once you have accepted the fact that your physical form will someday die, it’s

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