The Shortcomings Of The United Nation

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Although the United Nation has its shortcomings, as will all supranational organizations, it has a tendency to perform well in some areas, given its scale and age this is impressive by any account, and consistently fail in other, possibly more pertinent realms of governance. A simple example of this is how the world, by extension the United Nations, is more willing to negotiate and work together in areas related to trade and politics, to a lesser degree, but historically significantly less willing to formulate a resolution in aspects such as culture. The overarching issue with the United Nation is that it was given a mandate, a quite extensive and expensive one, to carry out. However, it has never been given all the necessary tools to even …show more content…
For the most part, these are carried out more in the global North than in the Southern hemisphere of our planet. Another superior tool that the United Nations is lacking in its arsenal is the ability to promote and enforce, when necessary, state’s commitments to numerous agreements. In this regard, a physical means in which to impose pressure to aforementioned states would be a great alterative however, it might not be required if the largest supranational origination in the world felt more homogeneous and singular, rather than every member trying to obtain a piece of profit from every conflict. Whether that be economical, social gain through media, or classical taking of goods and resources, it appears that everyone, with the exception of a few bodies, is in it for their own …show more content…
In my eyes, this completely negates most, if not all, of the strives towards a democratically founded entity of governing by the rest of the Security Council, as well as the rest of the United Nations. This is due namely because of the amount of attention that this section of the United Nation recovers over the other agencies. History of this day is age will be looked back on negative due to a reluctant stance towards war crimes and crimes against humanity that are being committed. What makes this different than past endeavors is now the United Nations specializes in observing and reported on these acts committed. Yet nothing can be done. Often times, actual peacekeepers representing the United Nations are on the ground and aware of the atrocities being committed and still do not have the authority to intervene, we have touched on situations such as this in class like with the Bosnian incident. Broadly speaking, the major change to the Security Council needs to be the limitation of the permeant five members. Narrowly speaking, the change that needs to be made in a timely fashion are a set of

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