The Selfish Giant Analysis

Improved Essays
The Selfish Giant is a story about a process of a selfish giant becoming a generous one. The Giant had a very beautiful garden where the children like playing. After the giant expelled children rudely, only the cold winter was in his garden. Finally, he realized that is was his selfishness prevented the coming of the spring. The giant proceeded to ruin the wall of his garden and to welcome children to play in his garden. Years later, the giant died and was taken to the Heaven by the child who was the incarnation of Christ. The giant is unaware of the cause of the winter and his selfishness. The giant is unconsciously cruel instead of inherent evil. The giant’s salvation finally reaches the consummation beyond his death in ultimate transcendence. …show more content…
As the possession owner, he naturally deems the deeds of the children as the infringement upon his property, space and privacy. Both the isolated lifestyle and his assertion of his garden as his personal property contribute to the blindness of his selfishness, as he declares that "my own garden is my own garden, anyone can understand that, and I will allow nobody to play in it but myself.” In this sense, the story also involves the moral degradation in such a society where people only reserve beauty to himself or herself. This moral degeneration defies with the principle of beauty and love advocated by Wilde. Ironically, the dilemma of the giant alludes to the weary and complicated reality. The giant's possession of a fantastic garden as well as his assertion of his property closely resembles the bourgeois lifestyle existing in the realistic human world. His selfishness is partly a result of the existing law and order, since the giant can easily deny the children’s joy of playing in the garden by posting a host as long as he is the owner of the garden. From this perspective, the giant has every right to protect his property, even to cruelly expel the children. In a sense, the giant is blinded by the law system and existing social order, which also contributes to his ignorance of his selfishness. The story thus reveals a paradox between existing law and morals. The giant has a lot in common with his human counterparts. For his insistency on law, his deeds of posting a notice is built on his belief of the social order which is granted by the law. The fairy tale suggests that the existing social order is not equivalent to goodness and moral

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Selfishness manifesting into hate is no rare phenomena. Ulrich, the initial protagonist of the story, feels that the forest land is rightfully his. He cannot help but hate those that try to steal what justly belongs to him. He is so blinded by hatred that sees exterminating those that try to take from him as an honorable and noble “quest” (6, 7). He originally thinks of Georg, his primary contender for the land, as an enemy, being the "man in the world whom he detested and wished ill to” (7).…

    • 1872 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    First of all, power leads to avarice as seen by Mr. Jones who, as the owner of the farm, abuses the animals for his own profit. It seems to be a natural instinct for humanity to differentiate themselves as better than animals. As a result, they enjoy the benefits that the animals bring to them. Mr. Jones is a typical representative…

    • 1127 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Is agriculture really a harm to society? The controversial Jared Diamond seems to believe so. Is this ‘enthusiastic’ man correct in his lack of faith in the culture of farming, or has agriculture helped the progression of humanity? Is the sickness and suffering of our modern world caused by the creation of a stable food source? Diamond’s extreme opposition towards the progressivist point of view is evident in his writing because he portrays the supporters as an indulgent party, unwilling to work hard for their food, though his overall sarcastic tone and overbearing language makes it hard to take him seriously.…

    • 1040 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He says how he can’t see the evil in society or his shame making him feel loss and unaware of his identity and truth. Oedipus is living life with embarrassment and no admiration in his society. However, Oedipus gets violent towards Tiresias. "I can, if there is power in truth, you sightless, witless, senseless, mad old man!"(20). Oedipus 's insolent behavior and manners is what made him lose his identity.…

    • 1950 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Due to this, Priestly is trying to express that everybody in society should be treated equally and take on the same amount of responsibilities as each other. Therefore, this displays that throughout the play, Mr Birling is extremely guilty of abusing his power over wealth, authority and people in order to protect his reputation in society. As a result, Priestly presents Birling as a self-centred and ignorant character who fails to change his attitude as the play develops. However Sheila Birling like Arthur, abuses her authority over people although she is able prove that she isn’t as ignorant and selfish as her…

    • 1011 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    His reasoning for this is that he feels the “natural state” of man is to live without government, so there should only be government to alleviate the problems of man. If a government fails in this task, it is blameworthy. And in this is where he finds his foundation for rebellion. Tying in with this is another recurring theme of “natural state.” Many parts of Common Sense detail imagined “natural states” in…

    • 1328 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He questioned the ‘happiness’ members of the society received, questioned how they could be happy without first suffering for it, as so many characters in Shakespeare had done so. John wanted people to experience happiness through the pain and misery first- the way that he had experienced joy, and therefore believed was the only true way. John is appalled by the removal of high art from society and views the civilized world as barbaric and strange. In turn, he is called “the Savage” and showcased as an attraction- a zoo animal- to the society outside the savage…

    • 717 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This quote is significant because Jack is suppressing Piggy’s freedom of speech in their democratic society. Since Jack represents the people with political power, and Golding believes that humans are naturally evil, Golding is showing that even in newly-founded democratic societies, the evil nature of people eliminates equality amongst citizens. Also, the fact that Piggy represents the bottom of social hierarchy clearly means that the boys have not set up a society where everyone is equal, which is another disregard of equality due to humans being evil by nature. Jean Jacques Rousseau, a French philosopher, wouldn’t even consider the boys’ original society a democracy. Jean Jacques Rousseau is the author of The Social Contract, a book which explains how to create an ideal society in order to address the social and political issues of his time.…

    • 1493 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This aspect of social hierarchy shames Bernard into feeling inferior, and it alienates him from the upper classes: “"I am I, and wish I wasn 't" (Huxley 69). In this manner, Bernard is acutely aware of marginalization in society, but he desperately yearns to be accepted by the higher social orders. This is one important clue to the “domino effect” of social conformity that makes Bernard ineffective in challenging the government or social institutions to change these tyrannical social rules. Bernard is self-defeating because his only goal is to be socially accepted, which defines the weak-minded aspects of revolt or “anti-social behavior that he pursues throughout the…

    • 1147 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Nature, a battleground for the rich and the poor, was fought over by the righteous wholistic man and the greedy man, but the idealism held by society during that time made the righteous into the wrong. In the book Serena, written by Ron Rash, that natural standard is thrown aside, as gender roles, religious roles, and the roles of people…

    • 1077 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays