Analysis Of De Beauvoir's The Second Sex

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While some women in society go against the myth of caregivers and weak individuals, Women are qualified as other in our social status because women are viewed to be submissive, physically weak, and are meant to be healers. Which is why I believe that de Beauvoir is morally and ethically correct, by believing the idea of the social myth behind woman is flawed.
As stated in De Beauvoir’s book “The Second Sex”, is mainly about the social role of woman. During the time she published the book she had collected lots of evidence to support her believe from the twentieth century. Throughout her book she shows how men fundamentally oppress women by characterizing them, on every level, as other. By which she defines exclusively in opposition to men.
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One of the many issues they face is the misconception that woman are to be submissive to the male gender. However De Beauvoir sees the separation between both men and women as an existential dilemma shown by the idea of self-determination and the exercise of free will. This is why she believes, “All oppression creates a state of war. And this is no exception.”(248) However she rejects the theory that the oppression of women, by showing the result of men creating property of profit-oriented or self development compared to the slave labor done by women. By which she means that the existential idea of freedom, responsibility, and generosity comes from a recollection of self will and …show more content…
De Beauvoir challenges that theory by suggesting that we look at both the men and women roles. In chapter 4 part 2, “The Nomads” she talks about the physical weakness woman had to go through dealing with the menstrual cycle. Which meant that during those times woman were disposable and weak. Throughout the chapter she discusses the Ideology of the past time line in which man did all the work and woman gathered at home and cleaned. “Men creates and shapes the future” (63) because she sees the pattern of the social norm of man she believes that it is time to see that the reciprocal repose in woman should be seen as normal. Because without our biology we are all human begins. Therefore men should be able to be caregivers and submissive as well as woman be able to work out side there norms and hunt. Change is something de Beauvoir urges to see in the future. However as of now society will continue to see women as weak, caregivers and healers. And man as workers, creative and

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