Analysis Of De Beauvoir's The Second Sex

Improved Essays
While some women in society go against the myth of caregivers and weak individuals, Women are qualified as other in our social status because women are viewed to be submissive, physically weak, and are meant to be healers. Which is why I believe that de Beauvoir is morally and ethically correct, by believing the idea of the social myth behind woman is flawed.
As stated in De Beauvoir’s book “The Second Sex”, is mainly about the social role of woman. During the time she published the book she had collected lots of evidence to support her believe from the twentieth century. Throughout her book she shows how men fundamentally oppress women by characterizing them, on every level, as other. By which she defines exclusively in opposition to men.
…show more content…
One of the many issues they face is the misconception that woman are to be submissive to the male gender. However De Beauvoir sees the separation between both men and women as an existential dilemma shown by the idea of self-determination and the exercise of free will. This is why she believes, “All oppression creates a state of war. And this is no exception.”(248) However she rejects the theory that the oppression of women, by showing the result of men creating property of profit-oriented or self development compared to the slave labor done by women. By which she means that the existential idea of freedom, responsibility, and generosity comes from a recollection of self will and …show more content…
De Beauvoir challenges that theory by suggesting that we look at both the men and women roles. In chapter 4 part 2, “The Nomads” she talks about the physical weakness woman had to go through dealing with the menstrual cycle. Which meant that during those times woman were disposable and weak. Throughout the chapter she discusses the Ideology of the past time line in which man did all the work and woman gathered at home and cleaned. “Men creates and shapes the future” (63) because she sees the pattern of the social norm of man she believes that it is time to see that the reciprocal repose in woman should be seen as normal. Because without our biology we are all human begins. Therefore men should be able to be caregivers and submissive as well as woman be able to work out side there norms and hunt. Change is something de Beauvoir urges to see in the future. However as of now society will continue to see women as weak, caregivers and healers. And man as workers, creative and

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Through years the role of a man was and still is to be the provider, fighter, and the “main man” politically, socially, and culturally. They are expected to hold their woman on the highest pedestal they can put her on, and is the strong and well endowed one in the relationship. While as the woman is and still is perceived as the one who practically moves up the social hierarchy by marriage, and is seen as peculiar if they “wear the pants” in the relationship. In Marie de France’s Lanval, she battles this stereotype through female empowerment by reversing traditional gender roles.…

    • 428 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    For as far back as written history goes, people have been divided by certain roles. Men were considered stronger, therefore they were the hunters and protectors. Women were considered more gentler, making them the home keepers and child rearers. These roles soon morphed into men becoming the dominate role and thought of as superior while women continued to sink down the societal ladder and became nothing more than an object, mere property to their male counterparts. These roles slowly adhered themselves in people and was supported by society as a whole.…

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Literary Analysis: A Double Standard The poem “A Double Standard” by Frances E. W. Harper was published in the year 1895 where inequality between men and women was in occurrence. This poem describes the concerns within this dilemma. Harper disagrees with the particular laws that represented normality within the community. She tends to feel that women are blamed for wanting diverse perspectives of living.…

    • 1291 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Martin Luther King and Simone De Beauvoir have few things in common; King being a prominent Baptist Minister and activist in the African American Civil Rights Movement and Beauvoir being an advocate for feministic philosophers and feminist theories. While it seems like they would come from opposite ends of any spectrum and lived overlapping lives in time, their biggest collective commonality was that they both were face with oppressions in their time. Simone du Beauvoir being faced with being a woman and wanting to achieve more than what was thought allowed for her at that time, or King, wanting white people to accept black as their equal, wanting equal rights for all colors. They were both a radical in their generation, but both wanted more…

    • 1503 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This chapter is going to shed light on two distinctive feminist standpoint theorists: Dorothy E. Smith and Patricia Hill Collins. Among other feminist standpoint theorists, the feminist critiques of these two women stand out for me as applicable when analyzing Umm Zakiyyah's trilogy If I Should Speak. The mutuality Smith and Collins have is that they have sought a sociology which takes women's experience as a vantage point where they could see the full picture of society. They are empiricists who experienced marginalization in the patriarchal or racist society whether as housewives or professional and academic women, and of course for Collins as an African-American woman.…

    • 822 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Throughout history, society has viewed women with the understanding that they are to be seen, but not heard. According to tradition, men work and provide for their families while the women clean and raise the children. Women are not supposed to have intellectual thoughts and form their own opinions or ideas. In the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, many female characters face gender ideals which they are forced to uphold.…

    • 1513 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In her 1983 commencement address, “A Left-Handed Commencement Speech,” Ursula K Le Guin offers a very straightforward yet motivational message to graduates of Mills College, an all female school. She states that women are foreigners in an extremely male-dominated society full of aggression and power and emphasizes her argument that women are peaceful compared to men, thus highlighting the difference between the two genders. She encourages her audience to live and succeed on their own terms rather than emulating “Machoman” by creating an emotional connection with her audience, establishing her credibility, and crafting an image of woman’s own country that effectively stresses the separation between men and women but appeals to the need for equality.…

    • 840 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Gender Roles In Candide

    • 1622 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Voltaire’s Candide: Women’s Role in Society Women during the 1700s, the time period during which the novel is set, understood they had very little power; and it was only through men that they could exert any influence. Women at this time were seen as mere objects that acted as conciliation prizes for the gain of power and their sole use was for reproduction. Maintaining the duty of tiding the home and looking after the children, no outlet for an education or a chance to make a voice for themselves. Men acted as the leading voice in society, making all substantial decisions for women. The hierarchy of genders was ever so present and was based on the physical differences between men and women.…

    • 1622 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Becoming one of the most prominent social concerns, gender relationships have been developing throughout the history. Although feminist movements in recent decades have significantly improved women’s life experience in multiple significant aspects, there is still more to be done so that more women can experience equality in their daily life. To improve women’s societal recognition, it is vital to study the history and identify the sources of gender inequalities from a historical perspective. With examples from The Return of Martin Guerre by Natalie Zemon Davis, Louis XIV and Absolutism, and A Social and Cultural History of Early Modern France, both written by William Beik, these aspects that women experienced differently in the past can be…

    • 1101 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Bradstreet, Wollstonecraft, and the Role of Women in Society In the 17th and 18th centuries, women were expected to stay at home, raise children, and not have political opinions. Both Mary Wollstonecraft and Anne Bradstreet believed that they, along with all other women, were capable and deserved to do more than home making. The works of Bradstreet and Wollstonecraft demonstrate the role of women in society by explaining everyday life as a woman and arguing that women deserve the right to have opinions and a voice in government. Anne Bradstreet was eighteen when she arrived in Massachusetts Bay on the Arbella in 1630.…

    • 889 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    In one of her most famous quotes, de Beauvoir says “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.” This is similar to the theme because de Beauvoir is basically saying that nobody is born with the mindset and strength of a woman, but through experience they earn it. For example, Delia and Janie spend most of their stories as meek, quiet women. They sit in the background and let their spouses walk all over them until something pushes them over the edge. In Their Eyes Were Watching God, after Janie leaves Logan and leaves with Joe, she knows that love doesn’t just appear in a marriage.…

    • 1945 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Dating back to the time in which men were hunters and women were gatherers, the line dividing gender roles were inscribed deep into the beliefs that society still carries with them to this day. In this paper, I will focus on how The Abduction of the Sabine Women by Nicolas Poussin and the Oath of the Horatii by Jacques-Louis David both illustrate that despite being painted a century apart, the way in which society views gender roles of what a man and women should do/be, has not changed. Through the use of iconography and feminism it is easier to see how the figures in the foreground, the lighting and the symbolism within both paintings help further depict this perpetual way in which society defines gender roles. Iconography is the use of images…

    • 1498 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Gender inequality is an issue that has been happening for thousands of years, affecting cultures from all around the world. Women have endured since ancient times the title as the inferior being, the “other” gender besides the man, the weaker and less valuable specimen. This gender inequality created a huge difference between men and women, placing women’s rights under men’s jurisdiction, which dictated what women were and were not allowed to do. This issue was analyzed by the French and feminist supporter and writer Simone de Beauvoir in her text, “Woman as Other.” In her essay de Beauvoir explains the entire concept of women being considered the “other” gender apart from the men.…

    • 1418 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    In the seventeen hundred, there were different thoughts on what women are expected to do. Such issues are made on the questions of why women were created and what their duties are in society. However, in the twentieth century, there are no longer as any women issues as there was back then. One of the big issues back then was that woman were not to be treated equally to men. This was specifically talked about by two enlightenment thinkers named Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Mary Wollstonecraft.…

    • 1399 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Immanence Vs Transcendence Analysis

    • 585 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited

    Immanence refers to something inherent within oneself. Transcendence means to go beyond ordinary limits or to be superior. De Beauvoir uses “immanence” to describe the domain set on women; the limits of the domain are the boundaries of themselves. “Transcendence” expresses the opposing force, men. Men are thought to be powerful in the external universe, while women are more passive.…

    • 585 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Improved Essays