The Scientific Revolution During The Late Middle Ages

1112 Words 5 Pages
During the late Middle Ages, a great spirit of questioning traditional beliefs of the world began. This movement, essentially a rebellion against old views and ways, became known as the scientific revolution. Many great thinkers, scientists, and philosophers emerged during this period, sharing their ideas with the world. Many of these people’s theories, philosophies, and inventions still have a lasting effect on our world today, making it clear that the scientific revolution was a monumentally important part of the world’s history. The scientists, philosophers, and astronomers of this time introduced a number of theories that made their mark on the minds of science for years to come. One hugely significant example of this is the theory that …show more content…
This theory is the prevalent belief in today’s science, but there was much resistance to this concept when it was new. Johannes Kepler used mathematics to prove that the theory was correct, but the heliocentric theory was still not accepted. Galileo, an Italian scientist, also made discoveries to support Copernicus (including the phases of Venus and sunspots, confirming that the planets orbit the sun), and yet the church went against these scientific beliefs because of the fact that it disproved the church’s ideas. As a result, Galileo was forced by the Catholic church to retract his statement that the universe was heliocentric, and Galileo had to publicly declare that Copernicus was wrong. In spite of this, though, the heliocentric theory lived on, and became known as a truth by scientists and common people alike. Other new views also developed during this time through other scientists. English scientists Sir Isaac Newton established the law of universal gravitation: he was the man who discovered the concept of gravity. A natural force that draws objects towards each other, gravity is a key idea in science that led to many further discoveries in …show more content…
While previously mentioned contributions to the world through the revolution had been purely ideological and intangible, these creations were solid proof that science was furthering mankind in his quest for knowledge and power over the physical world around him. One example of such an occurrence was the construction of the first microscope, put together by the Dutch Anton van Leeuwenhoek. It was Anton who, through his microscope, first observed bacteria living inside fluid. The fact that the invention of the microscope allowed humans to discover bacteria is momentous; without this revelation, the science of medicine might not have advanced as far as it now has. The microscope also provided a means by which other realizations could be reached, such as the finding of both cells and atoms. Though this invention was a gargantuan step towards where humanity is today, there were yet other pieces of equipment to be made. The invention of the thermometer was also an example of a device made in the scientific revolution that aided many people. Galileo—the same Galileo that supported Copernicus’s heliocentric theory—was the creator of the earliest form of the thermometer, which was used for measuring the temperature of the environment it was placed in. This temperature-measuring tool was improved by German Gabriel Fahrenheit roughly one

Related Documents