School Discrimination Case Essay

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THE SCHOOL DESEGREGATION CASE

In May, 1896 the Supreme Court delivered its opinion “Separate is equal” in Plessy v.Ferguson case which meant that separate but equal facilities between Color and White citizens was constitutional; therefore, segregation in school was legal as long as the Black and White students received the same education. This law was upheld for fifty eight years later until May 14, 1954 when the Supreme Court drove to its decision on Brown v. Broad of Education of Topeka Kansas case that the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ has no place in the field of public education. This decision landmarked a turning day in American history that the African American was becoming accepted in the White society.
The case started in Topeka
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If separate was equal, why were blacks putting their lives on the line for fight for desegregation? It was simple answer, because separate couldn’t be equal. Segregation made one race become inferior and another race become superior. For instance, as a poor black child suffering during this time, Justice Clarence Thomas wrote on his book My Grandfather’s Son “I began to fear that I would never climb out from under the crushing weight of segregation. No matter how hard I worked or how smart I was, any white person could still say to me, “Keep on trying, Clarence, one day you will be as good as us…” (Clarence 47). In addition, the framers of the constitution used to be a child also a parent, in their original intention, whether they wanted themselves or their third- grade kids had to walk miles and miles and across a railroad to go to a school while there was another school was seven block from their house. It was for sure that there was no any children and any parent want that happened to their children or themselves, so there was any reason that segregation in school was necessary or even inhumanity. Moreover, there were many cases similar to Brown v. Board of education, black students were refused to attend a school because they were black even though there being no comparable “separate but equal”

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