The Salem Witchcraft Trials In Arthur Miller's The Crucible

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Arthur Miller’s famous play about the Salem Witchcraft Trials, The Crucible has an example of how certain circumstances can let people obtain control over society. In this play, a group of girls and many others are suspected of witchcraft and they start accusing other people, which causes hysteria to spread throughout the town. Most of the time, the accusations being made are false and used as a way to get revenge. In the end, many people end up dying because of the trails. The Salem Witchcraft Trials empowered previously powerless people such as Abigail Williams, Mary Warren, and Tituba by giving them the ability to determine people’s fate through accusations. The person who benefits the most from the Salem Witchcraft Trials is Abigail Williams …show more content…
In the beginning of the play, Abigail barely had any authority in the town. When her uncle, Reverend Parris, asks her what she and the other girls were doing in the forest, he reminds her, “I have given you a home, child, I have put clothes upon your back” (1094). This implies that Abigail is an orphan and because Parris has taken care of her all her life, she has to do what he says. Also, since Abigail is an orphan, she clearly does not have too much power in the town. In addition to this, Abigail used to work as a servant, which makes her role even weaker. However, once the trials start, Abigail attains immense power. Abigail’s former employer, Elizabeth Proctor tells her husband, John Proctor that, “Abigail brings the other girls into court, and where she walks the crowd will part like the sea for Israel” (1115). In this allusion of Moses parting the Red Sea for the Israelites, Elizabeth compares Abigail to a divine being, showing how powerful she has become. Many people in the town are blindly following Abigail, just like how the Israelites followed Moses. …show more content…
In Salem, a black slave most likely has the lowest position in society and since Tituba is a slave she is probably the most downtrodden person. Early in the play, Tituba is mostly treated badly by people and they do not really listen to her. Once Tituba finds out that her master Parris’ daughter Betty is sick, she goes to see her and Parris yells, “Out of here! ...Out of my sight!” (1092). Tituba’s actions seem to show that she cares about Betty and still Parris kicks her out of the room. He does not really care about what she says. The only things Tituba is allowed to do is follow the orders that she receives. When the news about witchcraft start circulating, people’s attitude towards Tituba begins to change and they listen and believe her. For instance, Tituba accuses Goody Good and Goody Osburn of forming an alliance with the devil and everybody in the room believes her. Reverend Hale, who is present in the room at that time even tells Tituba, “you must give us all their names…God will bless you for your help” (1110─1111). A while before no one cared what Tituba had to say, but now Reverend Hale, a very powerful and important person believes her. Tituba has the power to freely accuse anyone she wants and she will not get in trouble. Now, accusations by a slave can get white people in jail. As Tituba continues to confess in front of everyone, she also says the Devil told her, “Mr.

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