The Romantic Concept Of Romanticism: The History Of Transcendentalism

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Transcendentalism was a movement in philosophy, literature and religion that emerged in the nineteenth century to have originated from New England. The popular movement flourished in America after the American and Industrial Revolution. The philosophical movement expressed and reformed a new way of ideas that changed the way man understood their beliefs, along with knowing where their place is in the world while the society was changing. Transcendental philosophy as well saw that nature presented a way to free the mind and make a connection between the self and the spirit. Transcendentalists embraced the Romantic concept of potentiality in the individual, specifically the imagination. This literary movement had a powerful impact on the literature …show more content…
He believed in the existence of absolute goodness. He stated that it could be perceived through intuition and logic. The “father” of Transcendentalism, Ralph Waldo Emerson, later used Plato’s theory on that the world is an expression of spirit to develop his own theory of correspondence. Emerson, unofficial leader of Transcendentalism, developed a philosophy that served as paradigm for the movement’s members. His concept led all transcendentalists to develop a strong attraction to nature. Transcendentalists urged people to look at nature to learn about oneself. The philosophy quickly took root among the young minds because of its urge for change and reform that spread quickly and grew to be the liberal branch, as we know …show more content…
Each of his chaptered is labeled to represent a specific theme. “Sounds” is the title of chapter 3, the chapter that shows the reader to be “forever on the alert” and “looking always at what is to be seen”. Thoreau encourages readers to be out into society and the world we live in and interact. "I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I wanted to live deep and suck the marrow out of my life.” In the chapter, “Where I lived, and What I lived for” Thoreau wanted to get the most from his life by determining what was really important by removing himself from the normal life. One side was the economics: he reduced his material needs by living simply, so that he would not have to spend much time supporting a lifestyle that he did not need or simply care about. The other side was spiritual; it was his philosophical concern about the true essence of life. This reflects in the Transcendentalism movement by Thoreau showing the practical and the philosophical in his phrase "the essential facts of life" reflect both the material needs of a person like food and shelter and the philosophical needs like the meaning of life, which was being shown in Transcendentalism. Thoreau did not think the meaning of life was just the biological

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