The Prohibition Era Essay

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The Prohibition Era forever changed history for women in the United States. Prohibition was a period starting in the 1920’s and lasted all the way through 1933. Prohibition led to the eighteenth amendment which was upheld on January 16, 1919, which forebode the transporting, manufacturing, and merchandising of alcoholic beverages. This amendment was in action for fourteen years before the ratification of the twenty-first amendment. The twenty-first amendment, which overturned the eighteenth amendment was the first and only time in history that an amendment in the constitution was reversed. Furthermore, this time period was extremely crucial for women. Women had specific gender roles they were forced to abide by. They were a group of individuals …show more content…
They had absolutely no rights and even protested when African Americans were granted rights before them. However, when the women suffrage movement occurred, women started heading up in the political scale. The nineteenth amendment granted women the right to vote. Soon after, women were expected to work and make some family income when men had to fight for their country. Thus, when prohibition occurred it is believed that the women were the ones who made the most impact during this movement. Whether it was fighting for prohibition or the repeal of the eighteenth amendment, women contributed in many political aspects. The women whom joined the Women’s Cristian Temperance Union made their voices heard all around the United States and the Women’s Organization for National Prohibition Reform did likewise. Through primary sources like newspaper articles published in the New York Times and images, the argument revolving around women making huge impacts in the prohibition era politically have been made. Women will forever make their way higher in hierarchal aspects in society. It is history that allows that to happen and history will continuously be made as women gain more and more

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