The Roles Of The Monster In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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As detailed earlier, Frankenstein creates life, and what he creates is the monster, the creature. But throughout the book they experience several role reversals. Obviously, in the beginning of the novel Frankenstein is the creator, but further in the novel the monster becomes a creator, but only in the sense of “creating suffering and misery” (Cantor 107), such as when he kills William, proclaiming, “I too can create desolation; my enemy is not invulnerable; this death will carry despair to him, and a thousand other miseries shall torment and destroy him” (Shelley 102). Meanwhile, Victor is the creature, as he is subject to the monster’s will; he can do nothing but take on the passive role and suffer through them, as when the monster murders …show more content…
While he does not supplicate himself, the creature does say, “Oh! My creator, make me happy; let me feel gratitude to you for one benefit!” (Shelley 105), showing that he does recognize the power Frankenstein has in his life. When Victor is actually in the process of fulfilling his request he looks upon him. And, when Victor destroys the female, he can only watch. However, he is not completely impotent; “your hours will pass in dread and misery, and soon the bolt will fall which must ravish from you your happiness forever,” (Shelley 122-123) he warns Victor, and at this moment he is once again in the role of creator. He menacingly assures Victor that “I [the monster] shall be with you [Victor] on your wedding-night” (Shelley 123) and leaves. Later, on that date—and, earlier, kills Henry Clerval—he fulfills his promise and kills Elizabeth. In this way the monster fulfills his role as creator, creating anguish and despair, but also reflects Frankenstein’s part as destroyer, having murdered a number of people, all innocents uninvolved in the conflict between him and his …show more content…
Obviously, towards the start of the book, it is the monster who seeks revenge against his creator because he feels wronged; Frankenstein abandons the creature. who is his “Adam,” and dooms him to eternal loneliness and pain by making him ugly. After the creature is rejected by everyone he encounters, including the De Lacey family, who he felt great affection and performed kindnesses for, he vows vengeance against all mankind, especially against his creator, for creating him and making him suffer, sending him “forth to this insupportable misery” (Shelley 97). He exacts his revenge by murdering Frankenstein’s little brother (and Justine, indirectly), wanting to cause him great anguish, just as he has gone through. When Victor destroys the female companion he was working on, he also destroys any last hope the creature had for happiness, for salvation from his painful solitude. This is the final straw for the monster, and with this, he swears to cause Victor eternal misery. He murders Frankenstein’s best friend and, later, his wife. Frankenstein is now in the position of the avenger. He is so distraught after all their deaths that he proclaims, “How I have lived I hardly know; many times have I stretched my failing limbs upon the sandy plain, and prayed for death” (Shelley 149). But he is

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