The Roles Of Gender And Sex In Society

1597 Words 7 Pages
Pink, Barbie, princess, jewelry, makeup, dresses, dolls, bows, ballet slippers. All of these items listed and countless more defined my childhood when I was growing up. As soon as we women find out they are pregnant, most of them want to know what the sex of the baby is. In our culture, your sexual organs especially define you and any deviance from them is frowned upon and not widely accepted by society. It wasn’t till recently that our society started to become more accepting of those who identified as a gender other than the one they obviously represent or were assigned too. When I think about what my gender is and what that means to me, I have to ask myself what it was that shaped me, how the roles of gender and sex are assigned in society, …show more content…
The message that this sends to young boys and girls is very detrimental to their development as to what roles they can and should play be in society. 1. Reading from syllabus This focus of gender specific roles is well explained by Peggy Ornstein, Appendices from Cinderella Ate My Doctor, where she discuses the effects of the princess culture on young girls. She discusses the progression of the princess phase into the sexualization of girls, Bust as part of that there’s this unprecedented way that beauty and play-sexiness are marketed to girls at ever-younger ages. So I wanted to look at the impact of that and how it starts with the pink and sparkly, progresses to the diva, then goes to the overtly sexualized,”(Orenstein 198). Being a girl in America, I am very familiar with the obsession of pink and princesses but Orenstein has opened my eyes to just how much of an epidemic this has become. The problem doesn’t lie within the princess so much itself, as it does with what the princess symbolizes and this idea that if you don’t follow the lines of society, you have a potential for exclusion within your assigned gender role. Similar to the little girl …show more content…
2. Reading from syllabus As I discovered i n Kate Bornstein’s book Naming All the Parts, we define gender as a Social Construct in which we are assigned a gender and told this is what we are (Bornstein 203). But for some this black and white line between male and female can become grey. For Kate, her acceptance of becoming a transgender to match her thoughts and feelings to her body wasn’t exactly an easy one. For many who are going through sex transitions, constantly battle experiencing rejection and even sexual harassment from those who have biases or simple don’t understand. The pressures of society placed on young people can be extremely harmful to their development both physically and emotionally. 4th reading In Jessica Valenti’s book, Full Frontal Feminism, she describes this concept of a beauty cult and how it our society forces girls into thinking they have to be skinny and perfect and look beautiful all the time or they aren’t good enough. She talks about how beauty corporations, “depend on your feeling ugly,” in order to manipulate you into buying their products so you can be beautiful (Valenti 208). This is quite saddening in the fact that women are made to feel ugly if they don’t have invisible pores, or cute button noses, or tiny waste lines. 5th reading Advertising, especially in women based

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