Elizabeth Cady Stanton: The Women's Rights Movement

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Think, are women really treated equally with all of the same rights as men? After long, fought years for rights, women are still seen as being in the minority compared to men. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a women’s rights activist, one of the key leaders of the movement. She was just as impactful as the other women, struggling to get females the rights that they legitimately deserve. Despite being a woman with no rights, her powerful speeches and actions changed the lives of women in America forever.

Ms. Stanton’s aspirations in life were her father, Daniel Cady, and her husband, Henry Stanton. Having a major impact in her life, Elizabeth Cady Stanton began to attend conventions to abolish slavery, but soon felt neglected as she could not
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Elizabeth Cady Stanton was one of those few people that did. She took the advice and kept going until she could not go anymore. Ms. Stanton had left her impact on the view of women’s rights, and it was a positive one. Her time as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association gave her time to voice her opinions to allow every person to vote, man or woman, black or white. Even though she was a woman, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others said, “They thought blacks must be given the right to vote first” (Shea 17). She was selfless because Ms. Stanton knew that if they tried to fight both suffrage movements at once, both would fail. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a leader by example, she acted upon a situation and others usually followed close behind. “Those who had not wanted to hear what she had to say had then been in the minority” (Gornick 5). Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a positive leader with an effective way of influencing people. She made people open their eyes to see the discrimination happening against women and black people. All it took for people to realize that women were getting treated badly was a positive influence.

Lots of women share similar emotions about similar topics. The women’s rights movement was a prime example of that. Elizabeth Cady Stanton appealed to many people on an emotional level. “... Cady Stanton became an increasingly marginalized voice among

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