The Role Of Women In Rosie The Riveter During World War II

820 Words 4 Pages
As the Great Depression ends in 1939, World War II begins in Europe. America attempts to remain neutral but on December 7, 1941, Japanese fighter planes attack Pearl Harbor initiating America to enter the war the following day. During this time period, American women play the role of mother, wife and homemaker until World War II brings new opportunities. With the enlistment of American men, a fictitious tough, bandanna-clad workingwoman called “Rosie the Riveter” is used in marketing by the U.S. Government to recruit women to fill many of the positions previously closed to them. “Rosie the Riveter” is the name given to all women during World War II who gave their lives or worked in military supported factories (History.com). Bettye Branan, …show more content…
Bettye assumed when she was all grown up that she would be just like her mother. After graduating from high school, Bettye traveled to California to work in an effort to support the war. She learned riveting at Douglas Aircraft, welding in the plate shop at the shipyards, and bookkeeping at the Housing Authority. When the war ended, Bettye got married and worked as a bookkeeper (Branan). The primary role of women before WWII was that of a homemaker although some women did work as bookkeepers, secretaries, telephone operators and light factory work due to their husbands loosing jobs during the depression. The number of men enlisted during WWII was so great that it left male dominated jobs open to women. This role change from homemaker to factory worker, mom to secretary, etc.… opened many new roles for women in society. Women realized they could do everything a man could do in the …show more content…
All the Japanese people were brought to internment camps during the war and Americans were taught they were like animals through billboards, cartoons and other media. In public housing, African Americans were placed in older housing called the Iron Triangle. The California people made fun of those that came from the South calling them Okies, which means somebody that is ignorant (Branan). Prejudices and discrimination was especially present during the war since American citizens blamed anyone of the enemy nationality for the cause. Although California was not a segregated state, African Americans were still placed in their own housing complexes. This segregation may have been due to the number of people traveling from the South to work since segregation was still a part of Southern culture. The name given to people from the South by citizens of California only shows us how ignorant California citizens were to group all Southerners under one

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