The Gothic Genre In Bram Stoker's Dracula

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Introduction:
Dracula, written by Bram Stoker in 1897, has become one of the most popular and enduring gothic novels. This blood-sucking vampire is now an iconic symbol of horror, whose fame stretches far beyond the covers of the novel. Written at the precipice of the turn of the century, the novel touches upon anxieties of a society that was changing at an uncomfortably rapid place. Stoker used this unlikely horror story to convey the apprehension of the Victorians, which includes anxieties over the existence of the supernatural, prominence of the British Empire, and sexuality of women. As the world had progressed, society was unsure of the repercussions of scientific advancement and the increasing abandonment of traditional Christian
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Irish Writers at the end of the nineteenth century adopted this style of writing in order to comprehend and communicate their place within the larger British Empire. Some characteristics of this literature include dark, decaying settings, supernatural characters, and suspenseful narratives. By the Victorian Era, gothic literature had ceased to be the dominant genre in literature, as it was in the beginning of the nineteenth century. However, Stoker uses the gothic form of writing to communicate strong ideas about the draining effects of the British Empire on Ireland, as well as fear of the reality of old superstitions of the …show more content…
Instead of pointing to straightforward occurrences, the epistolary style adds mystery to the novel. The epistolary method also gives ‘credibility’ to the Dracula myth, by giving more than one eyewitness account of what is happening in the story. Giving multiple perspectives of the same story gives depth to the narrative and reinforces certain important values of the novel. Through the entries, the reader is shown motivations, cares, and hopes of each character, providing a window into the characters’ minds. One of the stylistic elements of this form is that each different episode must change its voice, so that it reflects the character. For instance, Jonathan writes in a matter a fact way that can be characteristic of a lawyer, Mina of a woman (with a man brain), and Van Helsing of a scientist. In addition to giving a more full and dependable account of Dracula as well as a clear ringing voice for each of the characters, the episodic structure also allows the novel to juxtapose the rational and supernatural world in a more coherent way. This is done partly through the suspense created by dramatic irony, and also because readers are given insights, thoughts, and feelings which make the story more

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