Progressive Movement Dbq

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Prior to the Industrial Revolution, the rights of women were limited or nonexistent. The common belief was that a woman’s place was in the home with the children while the man worked and provided for the family. These ideas were challenged and began to shift during the late nineteenth century as women participated in the Progressive movement and later, the first World War. During the period from 1890 to 1925 the position of American women significantly improved due to, more economic opportunities, greater political influence, and the challenging of stereotypes regarding women.
In the years following the civil war, our nation experienced tremendous growth through the Industrial Revolution. During this time, small businesses and artisans were
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The increasing influence of the Progressive party at the turn of the century initiated the improvements. Progressives desired to eliminate issues caused by corruption in government, big businesses, and called for reforms in society such as women's suffrage. They agreed with the ideas of people such as Jane Addams, who in her paper, “Why Women Should Vote”, stated that if given the right to vote, women could help improve society. (Doc C). Jane Addams was a prominent women’s rights activist who help found the settlement house movement and published works such as, “Why Women Should Vote”, dedicated to improving the lives of women and the poor. Women like Jane Addams, backed by the Progressives, were able to greatly influence the public opinion. With the onset of World War I, the large demand for support and workers for the war provided an opportunity for women to work which revealed their capabilities and the Progressive movement enabled women to become politically involved, voicing their ideas for improvement. Prior to this, women such as Susan B. Anthony argued that the advancement of household responsibilities had increased female capability which in turn, has improved the way in which the home is managed. (Doc A) Susan B. Anthony used this argument, and other similar arguments, to imply that these household management skills could be applied to the nation to help reform and improve society. Through getting jobs, women challenged their prescribed role in society and gained a greater economic

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