The Role Of Tracking In Follow The Rabbit-Proof Fence

Superior Essays
According to the Oxford Dictionary, tracking is the course or route followed by someone or something. The concept of tracking was an essential skill to the Aboriginal people in Australia. Before the colonization of the Europeans, tracking was a traditional trade skill in the lives of the Aboriginal people needed to survive in the environment of Australia. Soon after, tracking became a significant role in Aboriginal history because it molded the relationship between the Aboriginals and the white settlers. In the movie adaptation of the novel Follow the Rabbit Proof Fence, the tracker illustrates how perceptions of trackers can transform by witnessing the struggle of the tracker living in both white society and aboriginal culture. Therefore, …show more content…
Aborigines who explored the landscapes of Australia used tracking as an everyday tool. Over the years, the Aborigines adapted themselves to survive in the Australian environment. They had a spiritual connection with the nature that surrounded them. In the first chapter of Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence, Pilkington discusses how Aborigines would use fire as a tool for hunting to “flush out any game, such as kangaroos and wallabies, that might be sheltering” in the dense undergrowth (1). By noticing the different types of footprints animals could make, Pilkington explains how trackers were able to view details more explicitly and depict information differently. Also, the tracking technique allowed the members of the tribe to scout food more easily. Pilkington illustrates two hunters successfully, and easily, catching a kangaroo by knowing “both large and small game are easy prey,” because “their tracks are clearly seen by the hunters” in the rain (8).The tracking techniques became simpler with experience and allowed hunting to become easier for the …show more content…
In the novel by Doris Pilkington, Moodo is not an important main character. However, the movie introduced him as the antagonist to Molly and the girls. Moodoo works at the Moore River Native Settlement, which camps the “half-castes” children. The children were being being assimilated to brace and live in the colonial society as servants to the white people. Also, the camp was produced to stop the crossbreeding of the aboriginal race and the white one. Moodoo’s was fearless and a dangerous pursuer who becomes the greatest opponent to getting back home to Jigalong. In the novel Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence, Martha tells Molly, Daisy, and Gracie a story of the “black tracker” showing no compassion toward his own people in the camp. When three girls escaped the camp, Martha says the “black tracker” went to recapture them and when he found them, “the girls pleaded with him to let them go, but he wouldn’t listen, he just whipped them with his stock whip” (71). Angrily, Martha explained that he, “made them walk all the way back [to the camp], without a break, while he rode his grey stallion like a white policeman” (71). The “black trackers” are illustrated as betraying their own people by beating them and acting like a white authority. The native perceived the “black trackers” actions in two ways. Some “black trackers” are

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