The Role Of The President And Foreign Policy

1275 Words 5 Pages
A. President and Foreign Policy There is no more demanding job from being the President of the US. The President of US is responsible for the actions of the most powerful country in the world and if something goes wrong most of the times there is no going back. One of the roles that a president has is to deal with foreign affairs and the policies of the country. In the US it is a Presidents responsibility to be affective in foreign affairs, because the US is one of the biggest and most powerful countries in the world with many world partners in trade and international relations. The US has to deal in an everyday bases with many countries around the world. The President should be in good terms with the countries that are partners with …show more content…
First, the President is a commander in chief of the US and he does not need get consult (Nelson, 2014, 528). This power is mentioned under Article two (2) and it gives a lot power to the President. The US President is responsible for a number of people working under the military (Dodds, 2015). He has the power to recognize foreign countries and to receive their ambassadors (Dodds, 2015). This power is mostly used for diplomatic reason, meaning to create a relationship between another country and the US. There was this incident back in April 2014 when the Iran ambassador could not enter the US because he was not allowed too (Dodds, 2015). Furthermore, the President has the power to negotiate Treaty’s but also needs the approval from the power of the Senate because it is mandatory (Dodds, 2015). In contrast, the President of the US can confirm executive agreements without the use of power from the Senate. Overall there have been 17,000 executive agreements and an example of an agreement would be the environmental agreements between China and the US in order to protect the environment form climate change (Dodds, …show more content…
Almost every President has dealt with foreign policies in a different way than all the other ones. During the 19th century the Presidents of the US were somehow different from their successors because they would take action for serious matters without the consent of Congress but after that they would admit what they did, but support that they had to act quickly in fact (Bazelon, 2005). For example, in April 1861, Fort Sumter was attacked and President Lincoln had to take quick actions (Bazelon, 2005). Since Congress was not in session at that time he decided to take away the writ of “habeas corpus”, an action only Congress could have had power on (Bazelon, 2005). This action come in contrast with the action President Harry Truman took, when he executed troops in Korea without asking Congress and stating that he did not need their approval because he had ultimate power as a president (Bazelon, 2005). Iron states in his book that throughout history the presidents have been increasing the power they have on war far away from its limits (Bazelon, 2005). However this action has not always been a success for the president’s

Related Documents