The Role Of Radio Propaganda During The Cold War

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When the word “war” pops up in one’s head a few things that come to mind are death, fighting, and bloodshed. The Cold War was different than all other wars the United States has participated in. The Cold War had physical fighting, but it was more of a war of intimidation and superiority. Since the Cold War was a war over intimidation and superiority one thing that both the United States and the Soviet Union depended on is propaganda. One type of propaganda that was used frequently was radio propaganda. Both the United States and the Soviet Union depended on Radio Propaganda to convey certain ideals to many individuals. Radio propaganda was used frequently during the early stages of the Cold War since many people owned radios. The United States …show more content…
Radio Free Europe first started out as an experiment. The Truman administration did not plan for the National Committee for Free Europe in 1948 to have its main objective as radio broadcasting, but it then came to their attention that they needed to combat Soviet Union’s radio broadcast with one of their own. Radio Free Europe’s basic objective included: news, information, sports, music, religion, culture and entertainment, concentrating on subjects important to people in their homeland, avoiding preaching, no promise to be liberated, report problems with communism, analyze the Soviet Union system, and analyze western societies to try to get eastern European countries to rejoin Europe (Mitrovich, 5). Radio Free Europe wanted eastern European to rejoin Europe, but did not want it to seem that they were forcefully doing that. Also, showing the eastern European countries how the Western society lived by persuading them more than likely they would play popular American songs or current events happening in America. Radio Free Europe also gave its listeners hope for a better …show more content…
The Voice of America gave many communist refugees false hope. On May 29, officials at the International Refugee Organization claimed approximately 7,000 peaple a month fled Iron Curtain nations. Directly inspired by the promises of freedom and opportunity broadcasted by the Voice of America, many refugees arrived expecting American assistance. After, discovering that the United States helped only a few communist refugees, the relief workers reported, “hundreds of disillusioned and bitter persons” drifted back to the communist countries (Belmonte, 42). This was important because America gave communist refugees false hope and when they came to America they figure out that what was being said on Voice of America was not true. Even though, America did help some of the refugees the ones who did not receive help would usually flee back to their home countries. The refugees that came to America would return home and tell everyone else that what the Voice of America is saying on air is false and that America isn’t a great country like the broadcaster portray it. This would make them more likely to stay in the Soviet

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