The Role Of Patus In Virgil's The Aeneid

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Often it is said that Rome was not built in one day, this has become a very commonly used idiom that emphasizes that great achievements do not come easily. The common life goal we usually have as a society is ultimately achieve success, having a set goal and being able to accomplish it. However some fail to realize the essentials to success which are determination, patience and hard work, thus one must always keep in mind that great achievement comes with great cost. The Aeneid by Virgil is an epic poem written during the Golden Age of Roman that follows the story of how the Roman Empire came about and ended up with the first Roman Emperor Augustus in power. The character that plays the role of Augustus in this epic poem is Aeneas however the …show more content…
One of the three main duties that were to be followed by the Roman people was pieta. Pieta is one 's sense of obligation to their family, nation, and most importantly in this case, the gods. Juno uses this to her advantage when thinking of ways to prevent Aeneas from reaching Italian soil. The first thing that comes to mind during Juno’s plan to defeat the Trojans is asking Aeolus, the God of winds, to let out the winds and create a storm in the ocean where the Trojans are located that may “overwhelm them or break them apart.”(1.82- 83) She then begins to bribe Aeolus with Nymphs showing her level of desperation in obtaining what she wants. Aeolus replies that it is his “duty” to follow her commands; this is where the poet highlights the fact that Juno is essentially abusing her powers. The only reason that Aeolus would be doing as she says is because of his obligation to follow her orders given that she is the Queen of Gods and she is superior to him, showing levels of hierarchy. However weather plays an immense part in this passage as well symbolizing Juno’s anger towards the Trojan. There is also a metaphor being implied when illustrating the power of the winds that have caused great chaos. They can immediately be connected to Juno’s power. Essentially the winds that cause this great storm are controlled by …show more content…
Because there would be great chaos if all the Gods would have unlimited power they have fate which is the highest power in this instance. The power is also distributed between different Gods to avoid to prevent the exploitation of these powers and this is seen when Neptune is quickly able to stop the winds, “You winds,” he screams “you dare make heaven and earth Chaos, raising such riot of waves without my blessing.” (1.56-57) Clearly stating that in the seas he is the one who is the law and no other God or Queen can take that away because it was given to him “by destiny.” However it is apparent that Juno is capable of causing an effect on Aeneas’ behavior with her actions of trying to stop him and his fleet from reaching Italy. Once the storm beings to cause extreme destruction Aeneas throws a tantrum showing direct characterization and of how much importance glory is not only to him but the people in this time since it is a recurring theme. Moreover expressing of how much importance it is to Aeneas to be glorified and feel as his death is worth something. The fact that he is wishing that he died in Troy rather than a storm in the ocean shows his dedication to the Trojans and foreshadows the obsession he will have with building the Roman

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