The Role Of Augustus In The Aeneid

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Often it is said that Rome was not built in one day, this has become a very commonly used idiom that emphasizes that great achievements do not come easily. The common life goal we usually have as a society is ultimately achieve success, having a set goal and being able to accomplish it. However some fail to realize the essentials to success which are determination, patience and hard work, thus one must always keep in mind that great achievement comes with great cost. The Aeneid by Virgil is an epic poem written during the Golden Age of Roman that follows the story of how the Roman Empire came about and ended up with the first Roman Emperor Augustus in power. The character that plays the role of Augustus in this epic poem is Aeneas however the …show more content…
Because there would be great chaos if all the Gods would have unlimited power they have fate which is the highest power in this instance. The power is also distributed between different Gods to avoid to prevent the exploitation of these powers and this is seen when Neptune is quickly able to stop the winds, “You winds,” he screams “you dare make heaven and earth Chaos, raising such riot of waves without my blessing.” (1.56-57) Clearly stating that in the seas he is the one who is the law and no other God or Queen can take that away because it was given to him “by destiny.” However it is apparent that Juno is capable of causing an effect on Aeneas’ behavior with her actions of trying to stop him and his fleet from reaching Italy. Once the storm beings to cause extreme destruction Aeneas throws a tantrum showing direct characterization and of how much importance glory is not only to him but the people in this time since it is a recurring theme. Moreover expressing of how much importance it is to Aeneas to be glorified and feel as his death is worth something. The fact that he is wishing that he died in Troy rather than a storm in the ocean shows his dedication to the Trojans and foreshadows the obsession he will have with building the Roman …show more content…
For example, although the Roman Empire was extremely disciplined could there ever be enough discipline from stopping someone from thinking differently? It also made me question how the United States operates; can the laws that are applied ever stop us from being against them? Another thing that I asked myself during this analysis was how Juno would be in the modern society. This made me realize that most people would have reacted like Juno did, whenever we get told that we simply cannot do something we find a way to try to prove them wrong and we try even harder when it is something that we care for that is being put at risk. So was Juno in the wrong for being selfish and trying to protect Carthage from being destroyed? Even if it was simply an act of

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