Roles Of Parenting Styles

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This study was about the role of parenting styles in the development behaviour problems focusing primarily on how parents handle conflict once it has occurred. It was an observational study that took place at home with 52 mothers. The study examined strategies to prevent conflict with three year olds. “It was predicted that mothers of children with behaviour problems would use fewer ‘‘positive’’ strategies to resolve conflict, and would use reactive rather than pre-emptive strategies (F. E. M. Gardner et al.). For this particular study the authors used three different hypotheses, the first one being, “compared to mothers in the control group, mothers of children with behaviour problems will be less likely to use positive child-centred strategies …show more content…
They were trying to understand the early developments that modelled the interplay between genetic and environmental risk factors (Zahn Waxler, Schmitz, Fulker, Robinson, & Emde, 1996). There was little evidence about the role of positive strategies in the development of disorder, a study by Trickett and Kuczynski (1986) found that mothers at risk for child abuse reported using less reasoning and more power-assertion than control group mothers. “There is good reason to suggest that conflict may be prevented where parents are able to anticipate misbehaviour and employ pre-emptive strategies (Maccoby & Martin, 1983; Perry, 1994). However, where these strategies are used in a reactive way (e.g. after misbehaviour or in order to resolve conflict), the functional relationship between the child and parent’s behaviour is altered in a fundamental way. Patterson (1982), for instance, predicts that when parents respond to conflict using strategies such as negotiation and reasoning, there is a danger of the parent reinforcing misbehaviour, particularly if their responses are positive, or if they reduce their demands contingent on misbehaviour.” Naturally the research led the authors to the Child Behaviour …show more content…
They began with the Child Behaviour Checklist and Werry-Weiss-Peters Hyperactivity Scale which consists of 19 items and gives an aggregate score in different domains. Such as emotional regulation, activity, conduct, and social behavior (F. E. M. Gardner et al.). Previous studies support its reliability and validity, including ability to discriminate clinical and nonclinical groups (Richman et al., 1982), it would also predict problem cases after school entry. The purpose of initial screening of conduct-type problems in the study and the items would cluster together in the study which would have good long-term predictive validity (Sonuga-Barke, Lamparelli, Stevenson, Thompson, & Henry, 1994; Sonuga-Barke et al., 1997). The WWP showed high levels of internal consistency, to correlate with other measures of hyperactivity, and to identify children who have activity problems 5 years later (Sonuga-Barke et al., 1997). The next tool of measurement was the Clinical interview: Parental Account of Children’s Symptoms (PACS), which was a standardised semi-structured interview. It asked parents to describe the typical examples of difficult behaviours, and the interviewer then rated these detailed descriptions in terms of both severity and how often the problems (defiance, tantrums, destructiveness, aggression, and hyperactivity) occurred. The PACS produced two scores, one for the child’s ‘‘usual’’

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