The Role Of Media In The Civil Rights Movement

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The Media and Civil Rights
The civil rights movement is one of many historical events in American history. Media was the key to the civil rights movement success in America. One of the major impacts was that of the south and the drastic increase of televisions in homes of the American people. As well as the change in reporting styles and what was reported. There are some significant subjects that truly helped move the civil rights movement along. Print media, television, and journalist were the major contributors to the freedom of black oppression from the white man.
From 1955 to 1968 America went through drastic changes in the eyes of the people. We were plagued with race wars as well as the misuse of media and protection services provided to the American people. I will focus print media on Alabama due to the fact that it had such a significant roll during this time. Now before the television into everyone’s living room there was the newspaper. This was one of the main sources of how people would keep up to date of issues in their town/state. Now in the white newspapers there was a trend of never covering the incidences that really occurred. The colored view of things were never really covered that was usually left to the black newspapers.
Now, considering that the only time blacks gained nay mention in white owned newspapers wa when they were
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Many have played a large price to bring the news to our door step but not like those during the civil rights movement. The impact on our nation will be forever changed and never forgotten. The media will continue to drive our nation in directions that will be chosen by the editors and what people want us to see. In all the civil rights movement would not have been possible without the sacrifices that people made. From television to newspapers, news was brought to our nation and helped steer the civil rights movement in th direction toward

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