Greek Gods In The Aeneid

1687 Words 7 Pages
Greek and Roman societies were polytheistic communities who worshiped multiple gods at the same time. In ancient Greece stories about gods, goddesses, heroes, and monsters were an important part of everyday life. These figures helped explain everything from religious rituals to climate change. These figures and beliefs gave meaning of the world to the citizens in the Greek Culture. In part the Roman Culture often emulated the myths and legends that had originated in Greek culture. Through examining the similarities and differences between the gods and goddesses portrayed in each society enables reflection of the impacts these cultures have upon the modern. The oldest sources of Greek mythology are the two epic poems written by Homer: the …show more content…
Through these stories the creation of Rome and the natural world were explained to the citizens of Rome. In the Aeneid gods and goddesses determine the destiny of the mortal beings and hold supreme control. The Iliad was distributed 700 years prior to the civilization of Rome, and Roman works of mythology did not appear until 1000 years after the Greeks demise . Throughout the epic poems and stories there have been many gods and goddesses that have crossed the reader’s path in both the Greek and Roman versions. These gods and goddesses can compared between cultures enabling the reader to note the connection between the different …show more content…
Many of the Roman gods and goddesses were therefore the counterparts or equivalents of the Greek divinities and deities. The Romans also adopted the primordial deities from Greek mythology. Jupiter, the king of the Roman gods is sometimes referred to as Jove, and is the counterpart of Zeus. In ancient Rome, the pantheon of 12 major deities was called the 'Dei Consents ' meaning the Council of Gods. The names of the other principle Roman divinities and deities in Roman Mythology were Juno, Neptune, Ceres, Minerva, Bacchus, Apollo, Diana, Mars, Venus, Vulcan and Mercury. The gods and goddesses of Roman literature were depicted to be married. As the Roman Empire expanded they began to

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