The Role Of Gods In Greek And Roman Culture

1687 Words 7 Pages
Greek and Roman societies were polytheistic communities who worshiped multiple gods at the same time. In ancient Greece stories about gods, goddesses, heroes, and monsters were an important part of everyday life. These figures helped explain everything from religious rituals to climate change. These figures and beliefs gave meaning of the world to the citizens in the Greek Culture. In part the Roman Culture often emulated the myths and legends that had originated in Greek culture. Through examining the similarities and differences between the gods and goddesses portrayed in each society enables reflection of the impacts these cultures have upon the modern. The oldest sources of Greek mythology are the two epic poems written by Homer: the …show more content…
To contrast gods in Roman mythology depicted the mythological beliefs about gods in the city of Ancient Rome. God and goddesses in Greek culture were based on human personality traits such as love, honor, hatred, dignity, as well as their roles in life, which were determined by what they were the gods of; Zeus ruler of the sky and weather, Hades ruler of death, and Poseidon ruler of the sea and aquatics. In Roman culture the Deities were named after objects rather than personality traits. There are a few key differences between the role of mortals in the Greek and Roman cultures. In regards to Greek mythology gods and goddesses were important for the advancement of life but mortals were equally important. It was the mortal contribution in society that mattered in the end. In contrast Roman myths were rooted in the brave and heroic deeds of gods not mortals. This was because the mortal life was not important after their demise. Greek mythology focused on individualism; actions of the individual were of more consequence than that of the group, Roman mythology was not …show more content…
For example if some goal is a “Herculean task” it means it is an objective that requires a great amount of effort. In Greek culture Hercules had incredible strength and power, having to work hard for everything he achieved. This is derived from the “Twelve labors of Hercules. The drug morphine takes its name from the Greek God of Sleep, Morpheus. "Venereal disease" is a rather unflattering reference to Venus. The goddess of love fares better in the term "aphrodisiac", referring to any substance or circumstance that arouses sexual desire. Greek cultures impact on language is not solely just individual words but also many expressions which include; the Achilles heel, which is a person’s weakness or where they are vulnerable. This comes from the Greek Hero Achilles who was dipped in the River Styx and only his heel was not covered in the magical water. In battle Achilles was the bravest and was practically unbeatable until he was shot in the heal and eventually died. Therefore an opponents Achilles heal is where they are most vulnerable. Another phrase or “having the Midas touch” is when someone is extremely successful and it appears that whatever he or she touches becomes gold and more

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