The Role Of Gender Roles In Modern Day Society

2158 Words 9 Pages
Within western culture, gender is assigned by means of sex assessment which dictates everything they should and should not do. Gendered interaction is enforced starting from birth—messages of gender and its expectations guide children as they grow, drawing influences from the media, religion, and community. Failure to follow the expectations of an assigned designation can result in children forced to play with toys and engage in occupations that they do not enjoy to avoid social ridicule and neglect. Some believe that gender is innate while others encourage reformation of gender in hope of a more accepting society. Despite the insistence of the necessity of gender roles for an efficiently run society, traditional gender roles are dangerous …show more content…
Previous to 10,000 BC— the beginning of the Neolithic Revolution— Syeda Jafari (2015) states that men and women retained similar duties that would help them function more efficiently in their hunter and gatherer society. In the Paleolithic Era, members of both sexes worked together to hunt animals for their meats and gather nuts, berries, and other various herbs. Hunting provided 20 percent of food consumption while gathering provided the rest. Only when members of Neolithic society could take under their belts further expansion of land and were able to maintain settlement did women stop working in the fields to birth more children for means of increasing the population to fill workload. Jafari (2015) found through research that as time went on, this act by the women of Neolithic times has turned into a stereotype of women being weak and belonging in the house as men did more labor-intensive work as society has developed. The further this stereotype has been passed along, the more has been added to it, such as women being incapable of tasks other than taking care of the household and only being good for serving their husbands— both a sexist and heteronormative assumption. Due to various harmful and misinformed stereotypes being passed down through generations such as women being weak, girls have been put down and excluded out of …show more content…
Givens Dench (1998) believes that women should not seek social equality due to its possible marginalization of men and strongly believes in the gender binary and the traditional roles that lie within it. Dench advocates for a male-dominated society with the institution of traditional gender norms, arguing that they are natural and most beneficial since men and women are born different— an example being born with different physical strength capabilities— which contributes to a biological difference. Syeda Jafari (2015) states that strength is dependent against the body type and size of an individual. These traits differ between both male and females and are not strictly sex-related. Deborah Blum (2000) concurs with Jafari, stating that “sex differences are always generalizations: They refer to a behavior, with some evolutionary rationale behind it. They never define, entirely, an individual.” Blum (2000) describes that physical characteristics assumed to be linked to genetics can vary and be altered through environmental factors: an example being malnutrition cutting height— found to be 90 percent heritable— short. Would not a woman who exercised once a day for a year be stronger than a man who sits on a couch all day? Would a man still be stronger than a woman? The idea of men being stronger than women and thus destined to be more dominant in the house and the outer world is an then proven to

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