The Role Of Feminism In Today's Society

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Feminism is the advocacy of women's rights on the grounds of political, social, and economic equality to men, and should be supported more these days because men and women have the same rights and are equal. By the early 1980s, the feminist movement had a great success in changing social attitudes with women trying to do the tasks of men, such as professional sports, the military, Ivy League universities, high-earning professions, and the Supreme Court. Although these were a great success, women still faced many obstacles; including sexual harassment, sexual violence, and the gender wage gap. Even though feminism is still a big topic in today’s society, more common issues with feminism today are abortion rights, violence against women, and …show more content…
In the 15th century, a woman named Christine de Pisan challenged man-made laws that represented the fact that women were of property to men. There have also been iconic leaders like Margaret Sanger, born 1879, who was a leader figure in the struggle of women to win control of their own bodies. Other leaders like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, led the first women's rights movement in the United States in 1848, at a convention in Seneca Falls, New York. The nation's first women's rights gathering addressed a wide range of issues involving the unfair treatment of women. There was such opposition of the drive for equal treatment that women did not gain the right to vote until 1920. Another important early feminist was England's Mary Wollstonecraft. In her 1971 book, Vindication for the Rights of Women, she declared, "It is time to restore women to their lost dignity and to make them part of the human race." Her book was widely read in Europe and America, strongly influencing feminists who came after …show more content…
The equal pay act was signed in 1963, with the intention of getting rid of the gap between the wage differences of males and females. The gap is more pronounced in some everyday professions. In retail sales, women earn seventy cents to the dollar of a man, and among full-time lawyers, women earn eighty-three cents. Some argue that feminism is still a valid movement in the twenty-first century. The leaders of one of the second wave’s most visible groups, the National Organization for Women, concede that major milestones have been achieved for women in the areas of job security, domestic-abuse laws, reproductive rights, and other significant areas that affect a woman’s freedom to lead the life she choose an unthinkable concept back in Wollstonecraft’s era but contend that women still face discrimination on many fronts. Political representation in Congress, for example, still does not accurately reflect the nation’s demographics, and women in many professions encounter subtle biases in their careers. Much of that discrimination is linked to the perception that women who become parents sometimes abandon their careers to raise their children, at least for a few

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