The Role Of Family History Of Breast Cancer

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Human anatomy is a very complex to understand and study. Cells are highly ordered they grow and distribute to form new cells when they receive signals that the tissue in some part of the body needs them. Cells age, they can grow old or be damaged, which leads to deactivation or dying of a cell and those being replaced by new ones. However, sometimes this order is being disturbed, which makes the old and damaged cells not to die and new cell keep reproducing even though it is not necessary. The unpredictable division, which is called cancer, of the cell leads to formation of tumors. Tumors can be solid similar to tumors in breast tissue, or they can be not solid like cancers of the blood, leukemia. There are many types of cancer cells, some …show more content…
Based on a study that was done by several scientists, women with family history whose mother was diagnosed before 50 has a relative risk of 1.70 and those whose mother was diagnosed before age 50 has a relative risk of 1.37. Verves women without family history have a relative risk of 1.69 (Colditz et al., 2012). The difference is very small, which makes us to assume that maybe after age 50 family histories has a very insignificant affect on developing breast cancer. The same study concluded, “The relative risk of breast cancer increased with younger age at diagnosis but the association did not differ substantially whether mother was diagnosed with breast cancer” (Colditz et al., 2012). Another study concluded that currently the lifetime risk of developing breast cancer for women between 50-59 years old with family history and for women without family history is 1/43 (McGuire et al., 2015). It also stated that clinically women between 50-70 years have the highest mortality rate and this age range is the highest during which women can develop breast cancer; however, with screening programs starting earlier, which is before 50, demonstrated a reduction in mortality rate (McGuire et al., 2015). Based on the following findings we can conclude that if a woman with or without family …show more content…
For example, women with or without family history who are diagnosed with breast cancer at younger age, which is under 40, will receive chemotherapy, surgery, radiation, and hormone therapy verses older people above 70 probably will have surgery and hormone therapy and other treatments are being decided by the patient. This is because at older age there are many side effects caused my chemotherapy that can increases the mortality. Study done by a physician who interviewed patients with and without family history of breast cancer found out the following. A women was screening since age 50, experienced menopause at age 50, and at age 87 had an abnormal screening mammogram with microcalcification and over the period of time it kept growing, which lead her to do mastectomy and she refused other therapies (Walter et al., 2014). However, the important part of the story is that her daughter died of breast cancer at age 37. The abnormal results at age 87 could have been because of age; at this point we don’t have reasons for these unpredictable cell division at older age. The other study that was conducted concluded that the sensitivity of mammography testing is reduced in younger women, specifically related to age (McGuire et al., 2015). They recommend women to perform Magnetic Resonance Imagining (MRI) for women with breast cancer history between 35-55 years old and mammograms

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