The Role Of Civil Society In Afghanistan

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In January 2010, during the London Conference, the Afghan government agreed to invite Afghan and other anti-corruption experts to participate in an ad-hoc monitoring and evaluation mission. As a result in 2011, the Monitoring and Evaluation Committee (MEC) was established to fight corruption. This committee is responsible for developing clear and objective benchmarks for measuring progress in the fight against corruption, as well as for preparing periodic reports on national and international activities. Moreover, there are other institutions including Central Narcotics Tribunal, Internal Audit Department of Ministry of Finance, Afghan National Police, National Directorate of Security, Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Commission, …show more content…
(Schirch, 2011) The right to association is guaranteed under the Afghan Constitution. There are more than 1700 national and international organization working in Afghanistan. (Transparency International, 2013) According to a new law approved in 2013, the operation of these organizations are not controlled and challenged by the government. (Freedom House, 2012) Afghan organizations and activists had been struggling with both the concept of civil society and how to develop appropriate programs. (Winter, 2010) Despite of the difficulties, the country is still having a vibrant civil society. The term civil society is translated as Jama e Madani, has been widely used in Afghanistan, but there is no general accepted definition. (Winter, 2010) The civil society organizations face security threats in Afghanistan, especially in remote areas. Also the organizations working on corruption and human rights are to face these threats. (Transparency International, 2013) According to USAID (2009), civil societies in organizations are generally created to deliver support to specific groups such as women, minorities etc, which means that they focus less on the issues of …show more content…
(Bajraktari & Parajon, 2008) Afghan perceptions of media content are based on their decade of experience to misinformation. According to their experience, most media represent particular groups and are having personal/group vested interest. Afghan media are highly divided by tribal, religious, linguistic, and political identities. (Fraenkel, Schoemaker & Himelfarb, 2010) According to Law, the citizens enjoy the freedom of speech and expression as well as freedom of press and prohibition of censorship. (Freedom House, 2013) According to the report from Freedom House in 2013, the media in Afghanistan was noted as ‘not free’, however, there were significant improvement in the reporting on sensitive issues such as human rights and corruption in 2012. Afghanistan improved its rank in the 2013 Reporter without Borders Press Freedom Index, from 150 in 2011-2012 to 128 in 2013 and 122 out of 180 in 2014. Yet, censorship is still exists, and the government also censors Internet content, however Internet utilization in the country is low due to level of literacy. (Transparency International, 2013) According to USAID (2009), the media channels are seen as hesitant to highlight content about corrupt practices, and private media often suffer from the influence of dominant local interests. According to Torabi (2012), most of the

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