Cause Of Colonial Revolution

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Beginning in the mid 17th to 18th centuries an event known as the American Revolution gathered speed and took off, leading to the ensured independence of the United States of America. However, it can be argued that this occurrence was indeed not an outright revolution due to its drawn out nature and slow, developmental road to the actual physical revolution. These causes leading up to the war for independence include economic, cultural, and political circumstances. These economic events and ideals leading to colonial independence include the abrupt start and end of salutary neglect, the overthrow of the dominion of New England, the Quartering Act, and the Navigation Acts. The cultural events and ideals leading to colonial independence consist …show more content…
This development set the precedent for more independence from England because it showed the colonies would take political independence if the opportunity arose. Also, the Declaration of Rights as Englishmen were set into stone at this point, and this would create the first notion that colonists thought these rights extended to them as well. This also contributed to the increasing desire for political autonomy as England replaced their monarch with one they preferred, and thus the colonists were able to implement state governments. This would later come into effect as the colonists were already incredibly partial to a decentralized form a government, i.e. state rule and long distance rule from England, that it would be harder to allow a more centralized form of government come into realization. Next, the Intolerable Acts were a politically based event that showed the colonial and English distance politically due to the nature of the acts being mainly punishment based. England was infuriated over the occurrence of the Boston tea party and instilled an embargo and terminated self-rule in order to squash the feelings of rebellion. However, it actually raised the desire for independence due to the fact that the colonies now worked together to sustain Boston and they would later congregate to discuss the Intolerable Acts in the first Continental Congress. Also, the Intolerable Acts were demeaning and forceful, thus contributing to a greater anti-British sentiment. As well as this, the Declaration of Independence was an extremely important political action demonstrating one of the most final separations from England during the American Revolution. This was due mainly to the philosophical ideals in regards to politics, especially those of Locke and Rousseau. The common people, now literate, understood that there were both natural rights to man and that

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