The Risks Of Electronic Medical Records

987 Words 4 Pages
Have they ever considered what happens to their paper medical records if they are missing or lost? As of 2014, the federal government has required that all health care providers implement electronic medical records within their systems. Electronic health records provide a better way to treat patients; they are more accurate, easier to read and to be understood, as well as having the ability to share patient information with the healthcare community. Although some doctors believe that paper documents are less expensive than that of electronic documents, they are a better choice because they provide a better healthcare system. Electronic medical records are used to create a more efficient healthcare system, and therefore should be used universally. …show more content…
By having, a more accurate and better understanding of patient 's medical records enables a medical professional to do their job better. A survey was done through lab data of the health industries of six countries, and they found that one-quarter of the patients in the U.S. had stated that they have been given incorrect or delayed test results (French, 2006). With patients not being able to get the right care and accurate results, healthcare professionals are putting their patients at risk. Risk is the very thing that healthcare professionals are trying to protect their patients from. This is a patient safety concern, in which electronic health records would avoid this outcome from happening. An electronic health record system would be a critical asset to have by which it would notify a healthcare professional of results immediately. In addition, it would help to decrease the odds of illegible diagnosis, prescribed prescriptions and lab work. Therefore, electronic medical records would eliminate any incorrect or delayed test results. "As many as 225,000, people die each year as a result of a medical error- the third leading cause of death in the United States"(French, 2006). It is important that electronic health records be used universally so that the United States will no longer be a statistic for medical …show more content…
Personnel may not be equipped with the knowledge or skill set in knowing or understanding how technology works to operate an electronic health records system. In Chang-tseh Hsieh 's "Electronic Medical Record System: Current Status and Its Use To Support Universal Healthcare System," he argues that "The well-known fact that the medical industry lags in technology is enough evidence to know what the medical community does not and will not, for a very long time, at least, be willing to solely rely on technology. “(2010) In other words, he is saying that they lack the knowledge and trustworthiness of today 's technology (Hsieh, 2010). It is understandable why critics would argue this because technology is so diverse and many people have yet to accomplish the understanding and function of technology. Therefore, it may make it harder or impossible for people to understand how to operate a technological based electronic health record system. Though it is a valid point, technology can be taught, learned and

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