Rise Of Industrialization Analysis

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The rise of industrialization at the end of the 19th century could be perceived two different ways. Although large scale capitalists had managed to create a boom within the American economy by creating Monopolies that made the capitalists wealthy beyond measure, the view of the general public was fearful. For it was the working class man that truly felt the harsh conditions they were subject to across all industries. In the gilded age, Chicago meatpacking company was the standard for how raw meats would be processed and distributed amongst the nation. It was the head of the meat industry; with the meatpacking industry thousands of jobs were available, yet it was because of monopoly capitalism that the workers of this company were afraid. Wages …show more content…
During the time of 1870-1900 America was going through the most unstable period in our history. Studying the time frame we see gradual progress is made by the people of our country, but it is at the direct expense of stability. For living through this time frame provided for economic boom one month then severe depression the next. Nathaniel Hawthorne once said families are always rising and falling. The gilded age is the exact time and place this quote applies. For we directly see how the trying times provided the specific conditions for opportunity to thrive. Men such as Andrew Carnegie who took full advantage of opportunity responded this this time by changing the economy completely. With his extensive steel industry, he was able to lay the groundwork for America to shape into the country it needed to be. He may have done this at the expense of the working classes comfortability, yet men such as him were looking at the bigger picture of the …show more content…
This class is composed of men such as Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, and JP Morgan. These men owned the industries that boomed the economy, from Carnegie owning steel to JP Morgan owning the banks, these men knew that the country was in a great time of prosperity. Their ideology was that of social Darwinism, the reason for them to reach the pentacle of success was because they were the fittest. This ideology was in direct contrast to that of the working class of the nation, who believed that too much money and power in the hands of a select few was dangerous. Andrew Carnegie lived under the belief that the extreme concentration of wealth that he accumulated was essential to America thriving, because with such a vast amount of wealth he could help the rest of the entire country overcome the obstacles that kept them bound to the lowest of classes in the nation. In this way of thinking it was the working or dangerous classes of Americans that would be the ruin of America if it had been left to them. It was the politics of men with the status and power to make changes that would shape the American economy for the

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